Seniors First Inc
5395 L.B. McLeod Road
Orlando FL 32811
Contact Information
Address 5395 L.B. McLeod Road
Orlando, FL 32811
Phone (407) 292-0177 216
Fax (407) 292-2773
Web and Social Media
Donate with a credit card https://secure.qgiv.com/for/senfirqgiv/
LinkedIn
Video
Caring for Central Florida
Mission
Mission

The Seniors First mission is to enhance the quality of life of seniors by maintaining their independence and dignity.

Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Marsha L. Lorenz
Board Chair Larry Stewart
Board Chair Company Affiliation Seaside National Bank & Trust
History
IRS Ruling Year 1988
Former Names
NameYear
VNA of Central Florida/Community Care for the Elderly2008
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expense Bar Graph
 
 
Projected Revenue $9,314,030.00
Projected Expenses $9,260,029.00
Statements
Mission

The Seniors First mission is to enhance the quality of life of seniors by maintaining their independence and dignity.

Impact

Seniors First is the safety net for at-risk seniors with limited options. Our network of community-based programs and services provides a continuum of care to prevent hunger and strengthen and support vulnerable seniors in promoting and maintaining their health and independence. Despite the conditions that interfere with a senior’s ability to experience happy, healthy aging, such as food insecurity, decreased mobility, mental and physical health issues and disabilities, and societal disregard for older adults/ageism, our clients have shown themselves to be incredibly resilient. Providing daily meals and in-home support services has an immediate impact on the daily lives of the seniors we serve.

Our accomplishments in 2017 included:

  • providing enhanced meals to our Meals on Wheels and Neighborhood Lunch Program clients
  • recruiting 145 new Meals on Wheels volunteers – thereby drastically reducing the number of open meals routes and relying on staff to deliver meals
  • increasing our exposure in the community

 In 2017 we helped 4,763 individuals in need:

  • Meal Programs: Between our Meals on Wheels and Neighborhood Lunch Programs, we served 326,061 meals to 2,566 older adults
  • In-home Care: 1,335 seniors received 153,991 hours of homemaking, personal care, companionship and respite services
  • Medical Equipment: Stepping Stone Medical Equipment Bank provided 642 pieces of equipment to 492 clients
  • Guardianship: 122 individuals in Orange and Seminole Counties received our guardianship care
  • Transportation: Our fleet of vans made 53,378 trips, transporting 605 older adults

2018 NEEDS: Adults 65 and older are the fastest growing population in the United States, yet, only 6% of nonprofits in the entire nation provide services to seniors. Growth among the highest-need seniors, those 85+, is especially dramatic, projected to nearly double over the next 20 years (Giving USA Foundation, 2017). Florida boasts the highest proportion of seniors, representing nearly 20% of our citizens (Pew Research Center, 2015), yet the number of nonprofits to serve Florida seniors per capita is .31, ranking 49th in the nation.

  • Increased community awareness that the basic needs of our seniors are often overlooked, and seniors are becoming isolated, while silently going hungry in our community.
  • Recruit a team of 50 on-call Meals on Wheels volunteer drivers to fill delivery gaps/vacancies.
  • Increased private contributions from all sources to support infrastructure expansion to meet the service needs of the growing senior population.
  • A new box truck for Stepping Stone Medical Equipment Bank to pick up donations of and make home deliveries for larger items.
  • 10 laptops for case managers and site supervisors.
  • Critical cleaning supplies to stabilize and maintain unhealthy home environments and living conditions for existing and Adult Protective Service (abused/neglected/exploited) clients.
Independent Research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or program effectiveness? Yes
Needs

Adults 65 and older are the fastest growing population in the United States, yet, only 6% of nonprofits in the entire nation provide services to seniors. Growth among the highest-need seniors, those 85+, is especially dramatic, projected to nearly double over the next 20 years (Giving USA Foundation, 2017). Florida boasts the highest proportion of seniors, representing nearly 20% of our citizens (Pew Research Center, 2015), yet the number of nonprofits to serve Florida seniors per capita is .31, ranking 49th in the nation.

Increased community awareness that the basic needs of our seniors are often overlooked, and seniors are becoming isolated, while silently going hungry in our community.

Recruit a team of 50 on-call Meals on Wheels volunteer drivers to fill delivery gaps/vacancies.

Increased private contributions from all sources to support infrastructure expansion to meet the service needs of the growing senior population.

A new box truck for Stepping Stone Medical Equipment Bank to pick up donations of and make home deliveries for larger items.

10 laptops for case managers and site supervisors.

Critical cleaning supplies to stabilize and maintain unhealthy home environments and living conditions for existing and Adult Protective Service (abused/neglected/exploited) clients.


Background

Founded in 1966, Seniors First offers a vital support system to vulnerable older adults aged 60 years and up who have significant health conditions or mental impairments, are at risk for hunger and malnourishment, experience decreased physical mobility, and live on low income, in addition to adults over 18 living with disabilities. Our typical client is a 77-year-old widow living on very limited income, who is isolated or has little family support, and suffers from more than one illness and/or disability. These homebound seniors are unable to meet their activities of daily living such as cooking meals, completing personal hygiene activities without assistance, or keeping their homes clean and safe. Without access to services, more seniors will experience physical and emotional decline, impacting their ability to remain living independently and putting unnecessary burden on taxpayers.

Our mission work began with advocacy and referrals for Central Florida seniors and expanded to Orange County’s first Meals on Wheels (MOW) program in 1973. That same year, our congregate meals program—Neighborhood Lunch—was founded, and we have since grown to provide increasingly comprehensive community-based programs. In addition to our nutrition programs, we provide in-home care, medical equipment, and public guardianship to help individuals age in place. Our services are a proven, cost-effective means of helping functionally-impaired adults: 1) meet their daily living needs, 2) maximize their health and independence, 3) maintain or improve their quality of life, and 4) delay or avoid costly institutional care. As a result of our 50+ years of experience, we’ve learned how to serve seniors and individuals with disabilities with the utmost empathy and quality of care throughout Orange, Osceola, Polk, and Seminole Counties.

Evolution of Programs & Services

1966    Information & Referral Service
1972    Guardianship Program

1973    Meals on Wheels and Neighborhood Lunch Programs

1980's Community Care for the Elderly Program (Orange & Seminole Counties)

1990's Home Weatherization & Repair Service (program closed in 2016)

1992    Stepping Stone Medical Equipment Bank

2004    Emergency Meals on Wheels

2015    Community Care for the Elderly (Polk County)

CEO Statement

Simply put, we help seniors live at home.

No one likes to think about the aging process. Most of us don’t think about long-term care until a major crisis forces us to, assuming that family can/will care for us or that insurance and social security will support the unique medical and mobility challenges many seniors face. As we look to the future, we know the number of seniors in our country will grow exponentially over the coming years—the impact of the Baby Boomer generation and increased life expectancy. Recent studies report that six million of our nation’s seniors currently suffer from some type of “food insecurity,” which means they struggle with inadequate nourishment and do not always know where their next meal will come from. In Orange County alone, that translates to over 16,000 seniors (www.table60.org)—nearly enough to fill the Amway Center.

Unfortunately, programs that help older Americans live independently have not kept pace with these needs. The Meals on Wheels waitlist for Orange County alone exceeds 400, and seniors in need could wait months or even years. At least half of those on the waitlist are deemed high-risk. The waitlist for in-home care is also exceedingly high.

Programs like Meals on Wheels, for which Seniors First is the sole provider for Orange County, Florida, are vital to addressing this aging population. Meals on Wheels has been demonstrated through reputable research to reduce food insecurity, falls, and hospitalizations, saving significant taxpayer dollars and delaying or eliminating the need for nursing home care altogether (Brown University, 2014). The nutritious meals, friendly visits, and safety and wellness checks our clients receive ensures that the most vulnerable of our senior neighbors can live independently in their own homes. Proposed government cuts of any kind to these programs will widen the existing gap between seniors served and those who desperately need this lifeline.

Our hope is that you will join us in meeting our goal to help alleviate senior hunger. With your support, the challenges to meet the increased demand will not only heighten awareness about this substantial social, moral and economic issue, but it will insure that seniors experiencing the threat of hunger are not quietly overlooked and left without a solution.

 

 
 
Board Chair Statement

It is difficult to enjoy your Golden Years if you are not able to live independently.

With local, state and federal government funding, personal donations, grants and fundraising strategies, Seniors First offers community-based programs and services to help our clients who are struggling to stay independent, healthy and happy. Unfortunately in good economic times and bad there are many seniors needing assistance. For many seniors there is no family to lean on for support.

Addressing senior hunger is our number one priority. For many seniors a major burden is daily nutrition and sustenance. At Seniors First, Meals on Wheels is our primary outreach program to seniors facing this issue. Despite our best efforts we continue to operate with a Meals on Wheels waiting list of 400-500 seniors, of which nearly 200 are considered high risk.

Our goal for the next several years is to increase private contributions and expand the capacity of Seniors First’s meal programs so that we can alleviate the senior hunger problem. A grant from the Central Florida Foundation has made it possible for Seniors First to educate our community about senior hunger through the documentary “Leftovers”. We hope this will be a catalyst to spur more individuals, businesses and foundations to join Seniors First in feeding seniors through its Meals on Wheels program.

NTEE Information
Primary Organization Type Human Services
Primary Organization SubType Centers to Support the Independence of Specific Populations
Secondary Organization Type Food, Agriculture & Nutrition
Secondary Organiztion SubType Food Programs
Tertiary Organization Type Human Services
Tertiary Organization SubType In-Home Assistance
Areas Served
Geographic Areas Served
FL - Orange
FL - Seminole
FL - Polk
FL - Osceola
Geographic areas vary by program.
 
Goals
HelpWhat is the organization aiming to accomplish? This is the organization's ultimate goal for intended impact.

More and more, older adults are continuing to express their desire to age in place—to live out their years as independently as possible, in the comfort of their own homes (Stone, 2004). Baby boomers are the largest growing population, with an estimated 12,000 turning 60 every day. With the number of older adults increasing exponentially over the next few decades, we need to change the way we assist seniors and plan for this growth. To honor the desire to remain living at home, Seniors First combats the three biggest threats to healthy aging: hunger, isolation, and loss of independence.

  • Our short-term goals are to:
    • decrease food insecurity
    • improve nutrition
    • increase socialization
  • Our intermediate goals are to:
    • Expand our capacity to increase the number of clients we serve
    • Secure more private funding to support administrative and program needs
    • Increase community awareness of senior issues.
  • Our long-term goal is to empower seniors to age in place in their own homes:
    • Leading to sustained or increased health and independence, and therefore improved quality of life. 
    • Reducing caregivers stress and burnout, enhancing their ability to keep their loved ones in their own homes longer, delaying institutionalization.
    • Lessen the burden on publicly-funded entities (e.g. Medicaid, Medicare, emergency rooms, SNAP).
Strategies
HelpWhat are the organization's strategies for its stated long-term goals?

In order to accomplish our goals Seniors First will:

·        Deliver 20 community presentations to new audiences to increase awareness of senior issues

·        Identify 2-5 new strategic partners to support fundraising efforts

·        Increase fundraising revenue via the Donor Perfect platform, social media, direct mail, special events, and community outreach by 15%

·        Train and engage our volunteer board of directors on their role(s) in development and advocacy

·        Expand our newly developed Speaker’s Bureau

·        Research new innovative programs and fundraising initiatives 

Capabilities
HelpWhat are the organization’s capabilities for doing this? What resources, capacities, and connections support its progress towards long-term goals?

Experience: Seniors First continues our mission work, now in our 52nd year in the community, demonstrating our expertise and adaptability to internal and external changes over the years. With roots going back to 1966, we have grown from a small information and referral agency to become the largest social services organization in Orange County, providing a full continuum of direct services to our community’s vulnerable elderly. 

Assets: Our greatest assets by far are our dedicated highly credentialed staff and senior leadership, many of whom have worked together for almost 2 decades, who demonstrate a passion for those we serve. Our volunteer board of directors is committed to our mission and continues to connect us to the community.

Partners: Seniors First has developed and maintained many long-term community partnerships, collaborations and volunteers enabling us to provide more cost effective services. As we have grown, so have the relationships that are the foundation to our longevity.

Fiscal Responsibility: As a steward of public and private funds, Seniors First is committed to transparency. We have extensive experience complying with specific reporting and monitoring criteria per funding source, assuring outputs and outcomes are on target.

Indicators
HelpHow will the organization know if it is making progress? What are the key qualitative and quantitative indicators against which the organization assesses its progress toward its intended impact?

There are several metrics Seniors First regularly monitors in order to track progress:

·        Through client surveys, we see high satisfaction results indicating that meals and social interaction not only contribute to a client’s ability to alleviate hunger and remain independent but also contributes to an improved quality of life. We will continue to track client satisfaction via surveys at regular intervals.

·        A review of our waiting list numbers is a reminder of the increased need in the community for our services. At pre-determined intervals track the number of clients that have: 1) been added to the waiting list and 2) been removed from the list due to being added to services.

·        Our ability to recruit and retain Meals on Wheels volunteers is testament to the connection they develop with the clients they serve. Many volunteers have been bringing meals to clients for over 15 years. There is, however, always a need to recruit new and on-call volunteers due to volunteers that are unable to continue delivering meals. Track the total number of MOW volunteers and open MOW routes at regular pre-determined intervals.

·        As our Board of Directors embraces their newly defined fundraising roles, track the growth of new sources of funds, including new individual donors, grant awards, foundation and corporate support.

·        For more efficient programming, periodic evaluations along with feedback from client and caregiver surveys will reveal opportunities to improve processes.

Progress
HelpWhat has and hasn’t been accomplished so far?

Demonstrating progress for our clients tends to be more challenging than for other populations, as our clients remain on service until they are deemed unable to remain living safely in their own homes, or until they pass away. We must balance all funding sources and community partnerships to assure we are not faced with having to remove clients from services, which would be catastrophic for most. This is a reality we are faced with every day. 

Despite this challenge, we have expanded our capacity in numerous ways:

  • With a Central Florida Foundation Community Investment Grant we were able to:
    • Hire a part-time Development Assistant
    • Develop and implement a Speaker’s Bureau
    • Create a marketing and social media strategy
    • Increase our reach into the community
    • Recruit much needed Meals on Wheels volunteers
  • In 2017 we increased overall fundraising revenue by 24% over FY2016, some of which were new grants in response to the influx of Puerto Rican refugees, enabling us to fill a critical need after the devastation caused by Hurricanes Irma and Maria.
  • We have continued screening our documentary, Leftovers, to over 100 Central Floridians, in an effort to spread awareness about senior hunger
  • For our dedication to the Orlando-metropolitan area in 2017 Mayor Buddy Dyer presented at our Meals on Wheels March for Wheels event proclaiming March 2017 as Seniors First March for Meals month.
  • To ensure we target services to marginalized sub-populations of seniors, we improved our intake process in 2017 to begin tracking veterans
  • In 2017 our newly hired part-time volunteer coordinator secured 145 additional volunteers, raising our volunteer total to over 270
  • To improve our program evaluation process, we revised our client satisfaction surveys and started tracking hospital readmission rates for our Emergency Meals on Wheels clients

These positive changes contributed to our overwhelmingly positive program outcomes in 2017. Selected highlights include;

  • 100% of caregivers reported less stress as a result of our In-Home Care program
  • 100% of In-Home Care clients avoided assisted living facility/nursing home placement
  • 99% of Emergency Meals on Wheels clients showed maintained stability in crisis
  • 96% of Meals on Wheels clients improved their ability to live independently
  • 96% (average) of all meal program clients experienced less social isolation
  • 89% of Emergency Meals on Wheels clients avoided hospital readmission within a 30-day period
  • 100% of Stepping Stone Medical Equipment Bank clients reported their equipment makes it easier to complete daily living activities
Programs
Description
The Meals on Wheels program addresses senior isolation and hunger. Poor nutrition and social support are root causes of a deteriorating quality of life that can lead to premature institutionalization of older adults. Meals on Wheels (MOW) provides low-income, Orange County seniors aged 60 and older with a nutritious lunch and the option of a cold breakfast, home-delivered up to 5 days per week. Nutrition education and case management are also provided, as well as additional meals and evacuation information during hurricane season. We partner with 270 volunteers to bring meals, friendly faces, and welfare checks to each senior’s home, treating them with dignity and respect. MOW has 8 donated pick-up sites for 55 delivery routes across Orange County.
 
Due to the long waitlist for MOW, Seniors First developed the Emergency Meals on Wheels (EMOW) program in 2004. It operates the same as MOW, targeting individuals recovering from a recent crisis (e.g. loss of a caregiver, hospitalization), is solely privately funded, and only lasts for approximately a 30-day period.
 


Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Elderly and/or Disabled
Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Reduced food insecurity/improved nutritional intake; increased social connections/reduced isolation; maintained stability in crisis; maintained or improved physical and mental well-being


Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Increase clients’ independence and capacity to remain at home, delaying costly institutionalization that threatens their quality of life.

 

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

 ·       Client satisfaction survey administered semi-annually (MOW) and by day 20 of service (EMOW); administrative records; client interviews, and monitoring by State Dept. of Elder Affairs, Heart of Florida United Way and local governments.

Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Emergency Meals on Wheels: Edith is a 63-year-old who lost her husband this past summer and now lives alone. She suffers from a variety of chronic medical conditions that make her weak and fatigued. When we met her, she lacked the strength to stand long enough to prepare her own meals. Her pet cats had always been a great source of comfort, but she recently had to place them in a shelter because she could barely care for herself, let alone them. As a result, Edith was losing weight and struggling with depression, forcing her in and out of the emergency room.

Upon referral from a local hospital, her case manager conducted an assessment of Edith’s health and wellness, made appropriate community referrals, counseled Edith on good nutritional habits, and started her on Emergency Meals on Wheels (EMOW) to help her recover from this temporary crisis. Edith received home-delivered meals five days per week consisting of a hot lunch and a cold breakfast for 30 days. Each meal met ⅓ of her daily recommended dietary intake, and the volunteers who delivered Edith’s meals slowly dampened her depression with their friendly faces and conversation. Without EMOW, Edith would almost certainly face costly long-term placement in a nursing home or similar facility, forcing her to leave her home and forfeit her independence. Now having gained almost 10 pounds in a single month, Edith told us she no longer worries about where her next meal is coming from or that her physical health will be worsened by lack of nutrition. She is even in the process of getting her cats back from the shelter, as she feels well enough to care for them now.

 

Description

The Neighborhood Lunch Program (NLP) addresses senior isolation and hunger by providing meals and social activities in a community setting to Orange County seniors aged 60 and up. Poor nutrition and lack of social support negatively impact aging individuals’ quality of life, which can lead to premature institutionalization. NLP will serve over 90,000 meals this year to nourish active seniors and help them connect with their peers and community. A hot lunch is provided Monday through Friday at 14 donated sites across Orange County, in addition to daily activities like dance classes, educational and health presentations, blood pressure screenings, shopping trips, and games. Transportation is a key component of this program, as many individuals lack access to public transportation or have stopped driving due to age or disability. Vans provide seniors with roundtrip transportation from their homes to the NLP sites, ensuring no one is excluded.

Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled
Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

·       Reduced food insecurity/improved nutritional intake; increased social connections/reduced isolation; maintained or improved physical and mental well-being.

 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Increase the level of independence and capacity to remain at home, with better health through improved nutrition, reduced isolation and access to community resources, delaying costly institutionalization that threatens their quality of life.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Client satisfaction survey administered semi-annually; administrative records; client interviews, and outside monitoring by Dept. of Elder Affairs, Heart of Florida United Way and Orange County Government.


Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Rosalyn is an 89-year-old widow who lives alone and had very little social interaction prior to receiving services from Seniors First. Before she started participating in our Neighborhood Lunch Program, Rosalyn told us she “wasn’t doing anything and became sick and weak” because she was lonely and experiencing depression. She earns an income of less than $1,200/month, so after housing and medical expenses, she could not always eat as much as she needed or pay for transportation. Three years ago, Rosalyn began coming to our West Orange County site and she now attends 3 days per week. Volunteers frequently visit with Rosalyn and her peers to ask them about their rich, storied lives. Rosalyn is very friendly and smiles often, and she truly enjoys playing bingo and card games with her fellow seniors. Rosalyn has told our staff members that she absolutely loves the program, as it is crucial to both her mental and physical health. She worries much less about food and not being engaged with others, as she really has something to look forward to throughout the week. She also said the roundtrip van service has been a tremendous help, as driving has become too challenging and expensive for her.

Description
The In-Home Care Program addresses the challenges of aging that can result in unmet daily living needs, an unsafe home environment, and poor quality of life. These aging individuals are at risk for neglect, abuse, exploitation, and premature institutionalization, a great cost to the individual and taxpayers alike. To address these concerns, the In-Home Care Program assists low-income, homebound seniors aged 60 and older with daily tasks that have become difficult due to declining mobility and health. It provides a case-managed package of services—tailored to clients’ individual needs—that can include home-delivered meals, homemaking, personal care (e.g. bathing, walking assistance), caregiver respite, adult daycare, companionship, pest control, emergency response, and incontinence management supplies. The program serves clients in Orange, Polk, and Seminole Counties. 
Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Elderly and/or Disabled
Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Daily living needs met; reduced caregiver stress; increased access to support services; improved living environment.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Increase clients’ independence and capacity to remain at home, delaying costly institutionalization that threatens their quality of life. Prevent senior citizen abuse, neglect, and exploitation.

· 

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Caregiver and client satisfaction surveys administered annually; administrative records; client interviews and monitoring by State of Florida Department of Elder Affairs.
Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Billy is a 70-year-old veteran with no family support who was referred to Seniors First several years ago by Adult Protective Services. Physical frailty and mental health concerns were hindering his ability to maintain the cleanliness and safety of his home, as well as his personal hygiene. He had experienced homelessness and alcoholism in the past and was living on an income of less than $700 per month. His motel-style room was very unsafe and lacked cooking appliances.

Our case manager conducted a thorough assessment and immediately advocated for Billy’s apartment manager to move him and his roommate to a safer, cleaner room, which was done within the hour. She arranged for Billy to have new bed linens, towels, pillows, personal hygiene items, a shower chair, a refrigerator, clothing, and cleaning supplies. Seniors First also provided Billy with personal care assistance and home-delivered meals several times per week, plus weekly companionship to keep him company and help with errands. Since receiving services through our In-Home Care Program, Billy has put on weight and keeps sharp by completing puzzles and reading. He is very close with his case manager and personal care worker and is thrilled that the meals were customized to his preferences. Billy is duly grateful for Seniors First’s presence in his life and that his case manager continues to ensure his health and housing remain stable. Our case manager has also empowered Billy to stand up for himself, reminding him that he is worthy of dignity and respect. Without this program, Billy would likely have been institutionalized or returned to alcoholism or homelessness.

Description
The Stepping Stone Medical Equipment Bank addresses the mobility, comfort, and safety needs of adults living with disabilities. Physical frailty or weakness interferes with these individuals’ daily living activities, putting them at risk of premature institutionalization that costs taxpayers money and negatively impacts clients’ well-being. It is the only licensed (ACHA #1312981) provider of refurbished, free and low-cost medical equipment and maintenance in the state—serving Orange, Osceola, and Seminole County clients. Stepping Stone collects medical equipment donated from community members, which is then cleaned and refurbished by a licensed technician and sold at no charge or a nominal fee to clients in need. Donated equipment can be recycled numerous times. At time of service, clients and their caregivers are educated on proper equipment usage, and larger items can be delivered to their homes at no charge.
Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Elderly and/or Disabled
Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Increase capacity for seniors and disabled adults to remain at home with enhanced quality of life.

Recycling of up to 2,000 pounds of material each month from discarded equipment, keeping useful items out of our landfills.

 

·       

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Client satisfaction survey administered semi-annually; administrative records; client interviews, and licensing and inspection by Agency for Healthcare Administration.

 

Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Ramona is 85 years old, and after she and her family’s home in Puerto Rico was devastated by Hurricane Maria this fall, they finally decided to relocate to Central Florida. Ramona suffers from Alzheimer’s disease and extreme leg weakness. As a result, she is very frail and can only stand for very short periods of time. Her family was having great difficulty getting a hospital bed and equipment to assist her with bathing. Ramona had a hospital bed back home in Puerto Rico, which allowed her to sleep more comfortably and made it easier for her family to help her in and out of bed. However, Florida doctors would not approve a new bed for her, and transferring her Medicare benefits to be used here has been a very lengthy, frustrating process. Once Ramona and her family learned of Seniors First, the Stepping Stone Medical Equipment Bank delivered and set-up a semi-electric hospital bed, as well as a tub transfer bench to assist with bathing. Our staff members also trained the family on how to properly use both items. They were extremely grateful. Without Stepping Stone, their only options would have been risking Ramona’s health and safety by going without the necessary medical equipment, or further straining their finances to pay for less durable, high-priced equipment through the limited retailers available.

 

Description Seniors First serves as Public Guardian to incapacitated adults of limited financial means who lack a personal guardian and reside in Orange and Seminole Counties. Seniors First also provides Orange County’s legally-appointed private guardians with court-mandated training onsite each month. Our guardians protect the rights and welfare of our clients—referred to as wards by the courts. Wards are deemed incapacitated due to a disabling condition that renders them unable to make informed decisions about care, treatment, and other life choices. Our wards include individuals with aging-related conditions (e.g. dementia), severe mental illness, developmental disability, traumatic brain injury, and physical handicaps. Seniors First solicits private funding to provide wards with clothing, personal care items, durable medical equipment, dental services not covered by Medicaid or Medicare, music therapy, and occasional social activities for more mobile clients. 
Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Elderly and/or Disabled
Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Medical and daily living needs met; clients live in least restrictive environment appropriate; clients’ assets protected.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Protect the rights and welfare of clients to enhance their quality of life; prevent abuse, neglect, and exploitation.

 


 


 


 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

        Orange and Seminole County Courts; Florida Department of Elder Affairs; Statewide Public Guardianship Office

 

Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Seniors First became the guardian of 84-year-old Hank in the spring of 2017. He currently lives in an assisted living facility, which is the most appropriate and least restrictive setting for him. Hank was in severe need of a legal guardian as he was declared incapacitated due to his dementia, and he also suffers from cataracts. No family or friends were willing or able to help Hank with his medical and major life decisions, but his visual impairment and dementia require him to have constant assistance and supervision. Lacking this, he was unable to complete his daily living activities or do what he enjoys the most, reading mystery novels.

Once Seniors First became Hank’s legal guardian, his case manager started to collaborate with other community professionals to secure funding for his cataract surgery, as Hank could not afford the high cost of the procedure. It took many long months to work with Medicare and Medicaid, then find a quality provider who accepts Hank’s insurance, but he recently underwent surgery and his eyes will soon improve to the point that he will be able to read again. Hank is very grateful. Without Seniors First advocating on his behalf, Hank may never have had access to this procedure and his quality of life would likely have deteriorated. Having empathic professionals on Hank’s side has done wonders for his mood and restored his dignity.

Description

Senior Tran addresses the transportation needs of the City of Orlando’s elderly living in the downtown area. Transportation that allows for socialization and independence is key to maintaining clients’ dignity and well-being. The City of Orlando Community Redevelopment Agency contracts with Seniors First to provide this service, which operates Monday/Wednesday/Friday with 2 buses, providing 4 roundtrips on each service day. Bus service is available to residents of 11 downtown residential buildings, traveling on a fixed route that includes grocery stores, shopping centers, pharmacies, quick service restaurants, and the public library. Senior Tran’s staff members help passengers get on and off the bus, carrying their shopping items into their buildings if needed. This service is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled
Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Increase socialization/reduce isolation; increase clients’ ability to complete daily living activities; overcome barriers to accessing resources and engage in community life.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

IncIncrease clients’ independence and capacity to remain at home, delaying costly institutionalization that threatens their quality of life.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Success is monitored by client satisfaction surveys, administrative reporting, and outside monitoring by the City of Orlando Community Redevelopment Agency.
Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Marty is an elderly blind man living at Baptist Terrace who has greatly benefitted from Senior Tran. Our drivers help him on and off the bus and have built relationships with staff at various businesses to help Marty complete his errands. The staff at Publix Super Markets, for example, take a break from their jobs to help Marty shop for groceries. He is much more confident and happy knowing his disability no longer prevents him from enjoying the Downtown Orlando community and living as independently as possible.

Comments
CEO Comments

“The mission of Seniors First, Inc. is to enhance the quality of life of seniors by maintaining their independence and dignity.” Typically, our clients live in their own homes, apartments, and in older neighborhoods where access to services is difficult.  

“Maintaining their independence” is defined as seniors having the physical and mental ability to remain in their homes for as long as their health remains stable, without needing to be moved to a more restrictive environment such as an assisted living or nursing home facility.  Key factors in remaining at home involve the meeting of basic needs such as: food, shelter, safety, and the ability to have access to medical care and social relationships.

“Maintaining their dignity” has been interpreted as support for “quality of life” issues, such as seniors having the ability to communicate and interact with peers for age appropriate activities, as well as oversight to assure well-being and respectful treatment.

The board further states that “In pursuit of this mission, Seniors First will bring about results in these areas, in descending order of priority:”

1. Basic Needs (the boards highest priority) - Adequate and sound nutrition shall take precedence over all other needs.
2. Quality of life needs include the need for human interaction, intellectual and physical exercise, our need to stay in and move about safely within our own homes and our need for transportation to the grocery, the pharmacy, and the bank.
  • Socialization and mobility
  • Ability to remain safely at home for as long as possible. 
3. Community awareness of senior issues
  • Available resources within the senior and larger community
Board Chair
Board Chair Larry Stewart
Company Affiliation Seaside National Bank & Trust
Term Jan 2017 to Dec 2019
Board Co-Chair
Board Co-Chair
Board
Board Members
NameCompany AffiliationsStatusCertificate*
Gordon Arkin Past ChairFoley & Lardner - retiredVoting
Kathleen Black Dr. Phillips HospitalVoting
Kim Blaylock & BarrVoting
Jamel Brown Access on TimeVoting
Michael Burch Voting
Derren Ciaglia Lowndes, Drosdick, Doser, Kantor & Reed, PAVoting
Carol Clark Orange County GovernmentVoting
Steven Fisher 1st Vice ChairTD BankVoting
John Gay 2nd Vice ChairCresa PartnersVoting
Michelle Hage Orlando Health - retiredVoting
Jerry Kassab TreasurerAspire Healthcare, Inc. - retiredVoting
Bruce Marin Foley & LardnerVoting
Melvin Pittman Orange County Community & Environmental Services- RetiredVoting
Allison Ramirez SecretaryROC Senior Housing Fund, LLCVoting
Margaret Sauer UCF School of Social Work - retiredVoting
Sol Schick Solomon F. Schick & AssociatesVoting
Jim Shapiro RetiredVoting
Larry Stewart PresidentSeaside National Bank & TrustVoting
*This individual has been awarded a Certificate in Orientation to Board Service by the Edyth Bush Institute for Philanthropy & Nonprofit Leadership at Rollins College ebi.rollins.edu,
Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 5
Board Ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 14
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0
Other (if specified) 0
Policies
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No
Standing Committees
Standing Committees
Committee Name
Executive
Nominating
Finance
Development
Comments
CEO Comments

Seniors First, Inc. is a Florida non-profit corporation (“Seniors First”). The governance structure of Seniors First consists of a President, who also serves as the Executive Director, and a Board of Directors currently comprised of 19 volunteers. The Board of Directors has the traditional structure of a Board Chair, two Vice Chairs, Secretary, and a Treasurer. All members of the Board of Directors serve on one or more of the working committees, such as executive, finance, nominating, and development.

Seniors First strives for ethnic, cultural and age diversity in identifying and selecting members of the Board of Directors. This is important in helping Seniors First to understand the needs of its clients.

Seniors First follows a modified Carver model of Board governance. At our regular meetings of the Board, the senior staff updates the members on the progress of the many programs operated by Seniors First, its financial condition and issues at the national and state level that might impact on our programs. The Board meets formally six times a year. The Executive Committee, which is comprised of the CEO, Chairman of the Board, Vice Chairs, Secretary, Treasurer, past Chairman, and four at-large members meet in the months when there is not a full Board meeting. Special meetings are called when necessary.

This year, the Board of Directors will be working on executing a strategic fundraising plan which will focus, in part, on increasing non-governmental sources of funding for its important programs, community awareness, and optimizing agency operations to provide quality services. Seniors First will be using the senior hunger documentary, "Leftovers,"  to educate and engage our community to increase support for Seniors First meal programs. In 2016, Seniors First marked its 50th anniversary.
 
CEO/Executive Director
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Marsha L. Lorenz
Term Start Aug 2008
Email mlorenz@seniorsfirstinc.org
Experience Marsha Lorenz was appointed as the President/CEO of Seniors First, Inc. in August of 2008.  She was the Executive Director of the Visiting Nurse Association of Central Florida, Inc. / Community Care for the Elderly since 1995 which combined with Seniors First, Inc. effective 1/01/09.  Ms. Lorenz directs all corporate operations of the multiple Federal and State grant programs and provides leadership, accountability and oversight for a planned system of efficient, cost effective and consumer responsive services.

Prior to serving older adults, Ms. Lorenz worked in a variety of settings including drug and alcohol treatment, children services and medical social work. She has an undergraduate degree in Social Work from Ohio State University and a Masters degree in Guidance and Counseling from Rollins College. Ms. Lorenz also has extensive knowledge of care management, home health care and community based service systems.

Her previous and current volunteer leadership activities include: past chair and current committee member of the Heart of Florida United Way Council of Agency Professionals, a member of the Florida Council on Aging as well as the past president of the Florida Community Care for the Elderly Coalition. Ms. Lorenz is also a member of Florida Executive Women (FEW).
CEO Salary Range $100,001 - $125,000
Former CEOs
Former CEOs
NameStartEnd
Randall Hunt Apr 2002June 2007
Susan Spitz Oct 1994Nov 2001
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 64
Number of Part Time Staff 62
Number of Volunteers 900
Number of Contract Staff 3
Senior Staff
Title Chief Operating Officer
Experience/Biography
Lisa Whaley joined Seniors First, Inc. in May of 2106.  She has over 20 years' experience in the Orlando nonprofit and association sectors.  Ms. Whaley is responsible for agency operations including six departments providing services to Central Florida seniors.
 
Prior to joining Seniors First, Ms. Whaley had several management roles at the Institute of Internal Auditors for almost 10 years.  While at the IIA, she directed the operations of its top-tier membership program serving Fortune 500 chief audit executives.  Before the IIA, she was community relations and volunteer director at Community Care for the Elderly prior to its merge with Seniors First. 
 
Ms. Whaley has an undergraduate degree in Psychology from Stetson University and a Master's degree in Public Administration from the University of Central Florida.
 
 
 
Title Chief Financial Officer
Experience/Biography

Seniors First welcomed Judy Mazzotta in April 2017 as its new Chief Financial Officer, replacing Dawn Phelps. Coming directly from Heart of Florida United Way as their Campaign Director in Resource Development, she previously served as Controller for 14 years followed by 12 years in financial management at Disney. Overall she brings over 30 years of accounting and financial experience to her CFO role.Judy holds two master’s degrees - a Master of Accounting from the University of Alabama and a Master’s in Business Administration from the Crummer Graduate School at Rollins College - and a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the University of Central Florida. She regularly volunteers at several community nonprofits including Give Kids the World, Second Harvest Food Bank and Coalition for the Homeless, and is a member of Florida Executive Women.

Title Chief Development Officer
Experience/Biography

After working in the mortgage industry for over 20 years, Wendy switched careers to the nonprofit sector in 2009 while living overseas in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. There she joined the board of the global International Women’s Contact organization as their Charity Officer for 3 years. After repatriating to the U.S., Wendy’s early stateside work in development was at Give Kids the World and Heart of Florida United Way. Having a passion for seniors she later joined Seniors First, Inc. as their Director of Development in March of 2014, and in 2016 became their Chief Development Officer. Wendy received her BA in Psychology from Florida Atlantic University and a Certificate in Professional Fundraising from Boston University. Wendy also serves on the executive board of the Association of Fundraising Professionals and as the Chair of 2018 National Philanthropy Day.

Title Vice President of Human Resources
Experience/Biography Debi Williams is Vice President of Human Resources. She joined Seniors First, Inc. in 2002 as Director of Administration and was promoted into key human resource management roles as Vice President of Human Resources in 2004.  With over 19 years of Human Resources experience Debi is responsible for the design and implementation of the HR policies and procedures throughout the agency. Ms. Williams received an accounting degree from West Virginia Junior College in Morgantown, West Virginia. She is a member of the Nonprofit Human Resources Association.
Title Vice President of Client Care Programs
Experience/Biography

Maura Hassey, VP of Client Care Programs, came to our agency back in 2009 when our agency merged with VNA of Central Florida. Maura Hassey has over 30 years of social services experience with 14 years of those years directly overseeing the various Federal, State and Local programs for the elderly in Orange, Seminole and Polk counties. Maura has a Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice from the University of Florida and a Master’s of Science degree in Health Management from Florida Institute of Technology. Maura sits on several committees dedicated to serving the elderly, including Orange County Commission on Aging’s Community Partnership, the City of Orlando’s Commission on Aging and Senior Resource Alliance’s Local Coalition Workgroup.  Maura is a life-long resident of Central Florida and a US Army veteran.

Other
Collaborations
Seniors First is able to provide direct services more efficiently through collaboration with a vast array of organizations, only a few of which will be mentioned here.  Donated space to operate our 8 Meals on Wheels sites and 14 Neighborhood Lunch Program locations (City/County Buildings, churches, and high rises in Orlando, Winter Park & Orange County). Individuals, hospitals, physician offices, etc. that donate durable medical equipment. An army of volunteers from the community, corporations and faith groups that collaborate to collect and deliver holiday gifts and meals so no client is forgotten. Social Work interns from UCF that provide case management services. Heart of Florida United Way 2-1-1 and Elder Hotline client referrals.


Affiliations
AffiliationYear
AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals)2000
United Way Member Agency1995
National Council on Aging1998
Meals on Wheels Association of America1998
Chamber of Commerce1998
CEO Comments
The Carver Governance Model that has been in place since 4/25/01, authorizes the CEO and Senior Leadership to develop policies and procedures for the daily operations. The executive committee of the board regularly reviews compliance with the established Executive Limitations (EL's)  under this model to assure protection of the agency and achievement of organizational goals.
State Registration Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Expiration Month Nov
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Expiration Year 2018
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01, 2017
Fiscal Year End Dec 31, 2017
Detailed Financials
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$245,799$291,652$196,068
Government Contributions$0$0$0
Federal$0$0$0
State$0$0$0
Local$0$0$0
Unspecified$0$0$0
Individual Contributions$113,578$28,958$67,337
$140,382$141,761$141,624
$7,937,236$6,969,019$6,979,481
Investment Income, Net of Losses$1,089$2,595$8,385
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$193,132$178,562$191,304
Revenue In-Kind$27,282$26,800$27,587
Other$26,742$37,313$27,039
Expense Allocations
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$7,345,236$6,318,136$6,350,424
Administration Expense$1,175,710$1,103,357$1,027,207
Fundraising Expense$123,196$135,098$135,053
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.001.021.02
Program Expense/Total Expenses85%84%85%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue18%21%23%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$4,636,134$4,650,777$4,575,920
Current Assets$2,383,954$2,423,518$2,095,952
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$870,308$926,049$971,318
Total Net Assets$3,765,826$3,724,728$3,604,602
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountEarned Revenue $7,937,236Earned Revenue $6,969,019Earned Revenue $6,979,481
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountFoundations and Corporations $245,799Foundations and Corporations $291,652Foundations and Corporations $263,405
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountSpecial Events $193,132Special Events $178,562Special Events $191,304
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities2.742.622.16
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
CEO Comments
Foundation Comments
Financial figures taken from IRS Form 990. 
Audit is consolidated and therefore balance sheet data is based on IRS 990.
Prior to 2009, 990s and audits were filed separately for Seniors First and Visiting Nurses Association.  990s and audits for Seniors First and Visiting Nurses Association that are posted separately above.
Endowment is held at the Central Florida Foundation.
 
Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster
Notes Programs listed here are those that are only activated during a disaster. Some organizations have unified budgeting and do not budget by program. Because of this, some budget fields may be blank or represent an approximation. Organization describes previous experience during the immediate response, recovery or rebuilding phases following a disaster.
Nonprofit Seniors First Inc
Address 5395 L.B. McLeod Road
Orlando, FL 32811
Primary Phone (407) 292-0177 216
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Marsha L. Lorenz
Board Chair Larry Stewart
Board Chair Company Affiliation Seaside National Bank & Trust
Year of Incorporation 1988