Seniors First Inc
5395 L.B. McLeod Road
Orlando FL 32811
Contact Information
Address 5395 L.B. McLeod Road
Orlando, FL 32811
Phone (407) 292-0177
Fax (407) 292-2773
Web and Social Media
Donate with a credit card https://secure.qgiv.com/for/senfirqgiv/
LinkedIn
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Caring for Central Florida
Mission
Mission

The Seniors First mission is to enhance the quality of life of seniors by maintaining their independence and dignity.

Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Marsha L. Lorenz
Board Chair Larry Stewart
Board Chair Company Affiliation Seaside National Bank & Trust
History
IRS Ruling Year 1988
Former Names
NameYear
VNA of Central Florida/Community Care for the Elderly2008
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $9,314,030.00
Projected Expenses $9,260,029.00
Statements
Mission

The Seniors First mission is to enhance the quality of life of seniors by maintaining their independence and dignity.

Impact

Seniors First is the safety net for at-risk seniors with limited options. Our network of community-based programs and services provides a continuum of care to prevent hunger and strengthen and support vulnerable seniors in promoting and maintaining their health and independence. We provide a vital support system to those who are otherwise unable to access or afford programs that offer older adults independence, choice and hope. Our services are a proven, cost effective means of helping functionally impaired older adults meet their daily living needs, maintain or improve their quality of life, and remain stable at home where they want to be.

Many Americans living longer are faced with decreasing abilities and increasing needs.  Outliving their support systems and resources, these vulnerable seniors find themselves in positions they never expected – isolated, having to choose between buying food or medication, and physically unable to care for themselves or their living environments. The relief on their faces is evidence of the immediate impact that providing meals and in-home support services can have on their daily lives.

In 2016 we helped 5,149 clients:

Meal Programs:

  • We served 245,331 home delivered meals to 1,589 older adults.  
  • Through 14 Neighborhood Lunch sites we provided 93,262 meals and socialization activities to 1,128 clients.

In-home Care Program:

  • Homemaking services were provided to 522 clients totaling 48,610 hours
  • Personal Care was provided to 346 clients for a total of 33,268 hours,
  • 180 clients received 31,165 hours of Companionship
  • 62,490 hours of Respite were provided to 232 clients and their caregivers.

Guardianship: 137 individuals in Orange and Seminole counties received our guardianship care. 

Stepping Stone Medical Equipment: 722 clients were served through our medical equipment bank.

2017 Goals:

  • Screen the documentary "Leftovers" 4-6 times to both small and large diverse audiences to spread awareness of the issue, recruit more volunteers, and raise critical funds.
  • Implement a multi-year strategic fundraising plan.
  • Develop enhanced menu options for nutrition programs.
  • Recruit 50 additional Meals on Wheels volunteer drivers
Independent Research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or program effectiveness? Yes
Needs
    • Increase community awareness that the basic needs of our senior citizens are often being overlooked, and seniors are becoming isolated and silently going hungry in our community.
    • Recruitment of 50 Meals on Wheels volunteers to donate their time and gas to deliver meals, a friendly smile and safety check for homebound seniors.
    • Increase private contributions from all sources to build capacity in preparation for the growing senior population that will need our services.
    • A community network of individuals to advocate to their elected representatives for increased support of community-based care vs. institutional services, which are proven, cost-effective and preferred by seniors.
      Background

      Created in 1966, Seniors First, Inc. has grown from a small information and referral agency to become the largest social services organization in Greater Orlando providing direct service to our community’s vulnerable elderly.

      Landmark federal legislation, the Older Americans Act (OAA) was established in 1965 to address the well-being of all our older citizens. The momentum carried to Central Florida when a group of individuals formed the Orange County Citizens Advisory Council on Aging, the ancestor program of Seniors First, in 1966 as an advocacy and information and referral organization. In 1973, the Meals on Wheels program began in Orange County as a fledgling volunteer program of the Christian Service Center which operated in church kitchens. In the same time period, the Orange County Public School System began a Neighborhood Lunch program for seniors. Both of these nutrition programs were funded, in part, through the Older Americans Act of 1965. In 1989, Meals on Wheels and Neighborhood Lunch programs were consolidated with the Orange County Citizens Advisory Council on Aging. These events laid the foundation for the organization that would later undergo a name change to Seniors First, Inc. in 1993. In 2009, Community Care for the Elderly/VNA was merged into Seniors First, adding in-home supportive services for Orange and Seminole counties. Today, Seniors First is the largest social services organization in Greater Orlando helping senior citizens through a combination of public and private funding.

      We serve the highly vulnerable elderly population age 60 years and older, seniors with significant health conditions or mental impairments, at risk for hunger and malnourishment, decreased physical mobility, sensory and cognitive decline, low income, and little to no social support. The one constant since 1966 has been enthusiastic devotion to providing seniors a support system that allows them independence, choice and hope.

      Evolution of Programs & Services
      1966      Information & Referral Service
      1972      Guardianship Program
      1973      Meals on Wheels and Neighborhood Lunch Programs
      1980's   Community Care for the Elderly Program
      1990's   Home Weatherization & Repair Service (program closed in     2016)
      1992      Stepping Stone Medical Equipment Bank
      CEO Statement

      Simply put, we help seniors live at home.

      Programs that help older Americans live independently in their own homes have not kept pace with the needs. Without home care and community based assistance, seniors are left with one choice – more costly nursing home care. For many years, Seniors First has acted as the main community resource for connecting seniors to available programs and services.

      No one likes to think about the aging process; seniors face a number of unique medical and mobility challenges. Too many seniors are isolated, living alone. Too many seniors are threatened by hunger. Too many seniors have difficulty paying for basic living needs. We'd like to change that in Central Florida.

      Seniors First makes it possible for older adults not to have to choose between paying for medications or basic living expenses versus buying groceries. Our services help seniors to meet their needs of daily living at home, which greatly impacts their health and ability to remain living independently.

      The strength of this organization is in its people. It’s the individuals who work in the programs on behalf of those whose voices have been diminished a little by age and a lot by loneliness. It’s the countless volunteers who are giving of their time, talents, and resources to make a difference in the lives of those less fortunate. And indeed this is what Seniors First is all about. Our programs and services are geared toward helping to improve the well-being of older adults and to help them live independently in their home environment and the community.

      As we look to the future we know that the number of seniors in our country will grow exponentially over the coming years – the impact of the Baby Boom generation. Recent studies report that six million of our nation’s seniors currently suffer from some type of “food insecurity,” which means they struggle to obtain adequate nourishment each day.

      Our primary goal at Seniors First is to decrease food insecurity and improve nutrition.

      Our hope is that you will join us in meeting our goal to help alleviate senior hunger. With your support, the challenges to meet the increased demand will not only heighten awareness about this substantial social, moral and economic issue, it will insure that seniors experiencing the threat of hunger are not quietly overlooked and left without a solution.

       

       
       
      Board Chair Statement

      It is difficult to enjoy your Golden Years if you are not able to live independently.

      With local, state and federal government funding, personal donations, grants and fundraising strategies, Seniors First offers community-based programs and services to help our clients who are struggling to stay independent, healthy and happy.

      Addressing senior hunger is our number one priority. This is very important to me, and is why I was attracted to Seniors First six years ago.  For many seniors a major burden is daily nutrition. At Seniors First, Meals on Wheels is our primary outreach to seniors facing this issue. Despite our best efforts we continue to operate with a Meals on Wheels waiting list of 400-500 seniors, of which nearly 200 are considered high risk.

      Our goal for the next several years is to increase private contributions and expand the capacity of Seniors First’s meal programs so that we can alleviate the senior hunger problem. A grant from the Central Florida Foundation has made it possible for Seniors First to educate our community about senior hunger through the documentary “Leftovers”. We hope this will be a catalyst to spur more individuals, businesses and foundations to join Seniors First in feeding seniors through its Meals on Wheels program.

      NTEE Information
      Primary Organization Type Human Services
      Primary Organization SubType Centers to Support the Independence of Specific Populations
      Secondary Organization Type Food, Agriculture & Nutrition
      Secondary Organiztion SubType Food Programs
      Tertiary Organization Type Human Services
      Tertiary Organization SubType In-Home Assistance
      Areas Served
      Geographic Areas Served
      FL - Orange
      FL - Seminole
      FL - Polk
      Geographic areas vary by program.
       
      Goals
      HelpWhat is the organization aiming to accomplish? This is the organization's ultimate goal for intended impact.

      The immediate mission driven goals of Seniors First are to alleviate hunger, combat isolation and enable independent living with enhanced quality of life for vulnerable adults, 60 years and older, by offering a vital support system to those who are unable to access or afford it. Our typical client is a 77-year-old widow living on a limited income, is isolated or has little family support, and suffers from more than one illness and/or disability. These homebound seniors are unable to meet their activities of daily living such as cooking meals, completing personal hygiene activities without assistance, or keeping their homes clean and safe. Without access to services more seniors will experience physical and emotional decline impacting their ability to remain living independently.

      Our long-term goals are to prevent premature and /or unnecessary institutionalization. Seniors prefer to remain in their homes and communities where they have established roots for as long as possible without being involuntarily moved to a more restrictive environment such as an assisted living or nursing home facility. Remaining in their own homes leads to sustained or increased health and independence, and therefore improved quality of life. Caregivers receiving respite assistance reduces stress and burnout, enhancing their ability to keep their loved ones in their own homes longer, delaying institutionalization.

      Baby boomers are the largest growing population, with an estimated 12,000 turning 60 every day. With the number of older adults increasing exponentially over the next few decades, we need to change the way we assist seniors and plan for this growth. 

      Our more specific intermediate 3-5 year goals include:

      ●       Expand our capability to bring more meals and in-home care to the growing numbers of seniors that need our services.

      ●       Increase private contributions from individuals, businesses, foundations and the faith community to meet the growing need.

      ●       Grow our community outreach, education and awareness of senior issues.

      Strategies
      HelpWhat are the organization's strategies for its stated long-term goals?

      In order to accomplish our short and long-term goals Seniors First will take a multi-faceted and integrated approach to its strategies. They are as follows:

       ●       Meals on Wheels and In-home Care are two programs key to meeting the daily living needs of our clients in order to remain in their own homes. Building the infrastructure to grow these programs is essential.

      ●       In order to grow our program capacity we need to expand our fundraising dollars. An overall agency fundraising strategic plan is currently under development.

      ●       Train and engage our volunteer board of directors on their role(s) in development and advocacy.

      ●       Develop and implement a speaker’s bureau to proactively expand our network in the community.

      ●       Seek new opportunities addressing the issues of senior hunger and food waste in our community. Seniors First has just been selected to participate in the What a Waste project, the National Foundation to End Senior Hunger’s innovative food waste solution. This will help Seniors First create menus and serve meals that can improve their clients’ overall nutrition and promote better health.

      ●       Research innovative fundraising initiatives. 

      ●       Expand access to resources and food. Our CEO is a member of the steering committee in a grassroots project to end senior hunger, focusing on food insecurity in our local older adult population. The mission is to foster a network of stakeholders who connect, collaborate and cooperate in order to provide nutritious food to improve health and enhance the quality of life for seniors in our community.

      Capabilities
      HelpWhat are the organization’s capabilities for doing this? What resources, capacities, and connections support its progress towards long-term goals?

      Experience: Seniors First is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year demonstrating our expertise and adaptability to internal and external changes over the years. With roots going back to 1966, we have grown from a small information and referral agency to become the largest social services organization in Orange County, providing a full continuum of direct services to our community’s vulnerable elderly. 

      Assets: Our greatest assets by far are our dedicated long-time staff and senior leadership, many of whom have worked together for almost 2 decades, who demonstrate a passion for those we serve. Our volunteer board of directors is committed to our mission and continues to connect us to the community.

      Partners: Seniors First has developed and maintained many long-term community partnerships, collaborations and volunteers enabling us to provide more cost effective services. As we have grown, so have the relationships that are the foundation to our longevity.

      Fiscal Responsibility: As a steward of public and private funds, Seniors First is committed to transparency. We have extensive experience complying with specific reporting and monitoring criteria per funding source, assuring outputs and outcomes are on target.

      Indicators
      HelpHow will the organization know if it is making progress? What are the key qualitative and quantitative indicators against which the organization assesses its progress toward its intended impact?

      There are several metrics Seniors First regularly monitors in order to track progress:

       ●       Through client surveys we see high satisfaction results indicating that meals and social interaction not only contribute to a client’s ability to alleviate hunger and remain independent but also contributes to an improved quality of life. We will continue to track client satisfaction via surveys at regular intervals.

      ●       A review of our waiting list numbers is a reminder of the increased need in the community for our services. At pre-determined intervals track the number of clients that have: 1) been added to the waiting list and 2) been removed from the list due to being added to services.

      ●       Our ability to recruit and retain Meals on Wheels volunteers is testament to the connection they develop with the clients they serve. Many volunteers have been bringing meals to clients for over 15 years. There is, however, always a need to recruit new volunteers to increase their number, as there are open routes that are filled by staff. Track the total number of MOW volunteers at regular pre-determined intervals..

      ●       Once our development plan is implemented an audit of fundraising milestones will determine future success in reaching our goals, including the ability to secure renewed and new individual donors, grant awards, foundation and corporate support.

      ●       For more efficient programming, periodic evaluations along with feedback from client and caregiver surveys will reveal opportunities to improve processes.

      Progress
      HelpWhat has and hasn’t been accomplished so far?

      With statistics like 1 in 6 seniors may not know where their next meal will come from, education and awareness of senior hunger is essential on all levels. With the help of a grant from the Rex V. Stevens and Dulciza Stevens Fund at the Central Florida Foundation, Seniors First was instrumental in bringing to completion a documentary on senior hunger, fittingly call “Leftovers”. The film premiered in Nov. 2015 with plans to continue screenings through 2016.

      To help better understand and communicate the work we do in the community Seniors First is undergoing a rebranding which will launch to coincide with our 50th anniversary celebration in May 2016. The rebranding is meant to improve our messaging and motivate others to join our mission and take action.

      In June 2015 we were awarded a competitive social services contract to provide Community Care for the Elderly in Polk County. This allows us the opportunity to expand our services reaching more elderly in need.

      Advocating for increased support of community based care vs. institutionalization is imperative. There is a need to help functionally impaired seniors meet their basic daily living needs safely at home instead of receiving care in a more costly, Medicaid-funded nursing home. Programs like Meals on Wheels (MOW), vital to alleviating the problem of food insecurity, also cuts the growth of health care expenditures on older Americans. Every dollar invested in MOW can save up to $50 in Medicaid spending. In 2014, the average cost for Medicaid-funded nursing home care was $82,000 annually while the cost of the In-home Care Program (Community Care for the Elderly-CCE) was $4,680 annually, according to the Florida Council on Aging. The savings are staggering.

      As the population of eligible seniors continues to grow, so does the need to be able to sustain current and new clients. Our clients remain on service until it is deemed they are no longer able to remain living safely in their own homes or until they pass away. We must balance all funding sources to assure we are not faced with having to remove clients from services, which would be catastrophic for most. This is a reality we are faced with every day. 

      Programs
      Description

      The Meals on Wheels program addresses senior isolation and hunger. Poor nutrition and social support are root causes of a deteriorating quality of life that can lead to the need for long term care for older adults.

       

      Meals on Wheels provides clients with a nutritious lunch and the option of a cold breakfast home delivered up to five days per week, nutrition education and case management services. We partner with 200 volunteers to deliver the meals, friendly visits and safety checks which provide the support homebound seniors need to thrive with dignity. The program has eight pick-up sites for 56 meal delivery routes across Orange County. These sites are designated places (donated space) where volunteers go to pick up meals for delivery. Case managers meet with seniors in their home to complete program enrollment and to connect them to additional community services. Since 2004, Emergency Meal Service provides seniors in crisis with quick access to meals for 30 days through private funding.

       


      Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
      Elderly and/or Disabled
      Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
      • Reduced food insecurity and nutritional risk (under nourishment)
      • Improved nutritional intake
      • Increased social connections; reduced isolation


      Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

      Increase the level of independence and capacity to remain at home, better health through improved nutrition and reduced isolation.

       

      Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

      Each program has specific performance measures and outcomes identified. Success is monitored by client survey, administrative reporting, and monitoring by State Dept. of Elder Affairs, Heart of Florida United Way and local governments.

      Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

      Emergency Meals. Living alone with no family in town, 66-year-old Mario V. was losing weight while trying to recover at home following open heart surgery. But he was having a hard time driving, and found it almost impossible to do grocery shopping and prepare meals. Mario had no one to cook for him or help him get food. Mario was feeling very alone, losing weight and depressed. His doctor referred him to a social worker to help him find a better solution, and that solution was Seniors First’s Meals on Wheels Emergency Service. For 30 days, Mario received home delivered meals, contact with a volunteer, and a case manager, Maribel, to assess and monitor his needs. As a result of this intervention, Mario has stopped losing weight, his health is improving, and he has a plan for ongoing support that will allow him to remain living at home. A warm meal and a friendly volunteer helped Mario’s mood improve significantly and his outlook return to being hopeful.

       

      Description

      The In-home Care Program addresses the challenges of aging that can result in unmet daily living needs and create an unsafe home environment. These elderly individuals become at risk for neglect, abuse, exploitation, and premature institutional care at great cost to the individual and tax payers.

       

       
      In-home Care Program assists low-income homebound seniors with daily tasks that have become difficult due to declining mobility and health. Seniors First provides a continuum of care through a customized package of services to assist seniors at risk of nursing home placement to remain in their homes or the home of a caregiver rather than relocating to an institution because of unmet personal care needs. Services include: Home Delivered Meals, Case-Management, Homemaker Services, Personal Care/Bathing, Caregiver Respite, Companions, Pest Control, and Emergency Response Assistance. Each client has a Case Manager to assess their needs, coordinate their services, and monitor their well-being.
      Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
      Elderly and/or Disabled
      Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

      • Increased access to support services
      • Improved, suitable living environment
      • Daily living needs are met at home; reduced risk of institutional care
      • Increased caregiver support
      • Seniors remain living at home


      Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

      Enhanced quality of life at home, and nursing home placement is delayed or prevented. Prevent senior citizen abuse, neglect and exploitation.


       

      Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

      Each program has specific performance measures and outcomes identified. Success is monitored by client surveys, administrative review, monitoring by State of Florida Department of Elder Affairs.

      Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.  

      Phyllis lives alone and has no informal support. Her emergency contact is a cousin who lives out of state. She is able to manage her finances, shop for groceries as well as bathe, dress and use the bathroom independently. But, medical conditions along with depression have left 61-year-old Phyllis unable to keep up with necessary housekeeping chores. Her living conditions had spiraled out of control. Foul smells coming out of her Seminole County condominium caused Phyllis’ neighbors to contact Adult Protective Services. A deep cleaning brought Phyllis’ condo back to a suitable living environment. Phyllis is able to remain safely at home with just 2. 5 hours of help each week with chores and laundry. This weekly visit also helps to reduce the isolation Phyllis experiences living alone. Phyllis simply can’t believe that someone would want to help her, and enjoys her new relationship with case manager Wanda who monitors her ongoing needs.

      Description
       

      The Stepping Stone Program addresses the need to help frail senior and disabled adults to perform essential tasks of daily living at home, with the help of safety devices and mobility equipment.

       

      Stepping Stone Medical Equipment Bank collects medical equipment, donated by those who no longer are in need of these items. This medical equipment is reconditioned and made available to people in great need, either free of charge or at a nominal fee. Donated equipment can be recycled numerous times to help meet the medical needs of our community. Durable medical equipment increases safety, comfort and dignity, such as: bathing with a shower chair; or the ability to walk with the assistance of a walker or cane; or access to activities outside of the home with a motorized wheelchair. (AHCA License 1312981)  Program Activities: Information & Referral, Counseling/Case Management, Accept Donations & Refurbish, Distribute & Educate, Recycle Metal.

      Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
      Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

      • Increased independence and mobility in performing activities of daily living at home.
      • Improved safety and comfort of clients.


      Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

      Increase capacity for seniors and disabled adults to remain at home with enhanced quality of life.

      Recycling of up to 2,000 pounds of material each month from discarded equipment, keeping useful items out of our landfills.

       

      Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

      Each program has specific performance measures and outcomes identified. Success is monitored by client survey, administrative reporting, and licensing and inspection by Agency for Healthcare Administration.


       

      Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

      When Lisa’s wheelchair broke, she was left totally house bound. She couldn’t walk her dog or go grocery shopping. Lisa applied to her insurance company, but was told she had to meet a $900 deductible. She was not able to afford $900 on her disability income. Lisa was referred to Stepping Stone Medical Equipment Bank where she found relief in knowing she could be mobile again. Lisa received a “new-to-her” recycled wheelchair. Lisa shared, “two little words, thank you, just don’t express how happy you have made me.”


       

      Description

      The Guardianship Program addresses the need to provide incapacitated individuals with a substitute decision maker. Guardianship is the legal process by which the court finds an individual’s ability to make decisions is impaired, therefore the court gives the right to make decisions to another person or entity.

       

      The Seniors First Guardianship Program protects the rights and welfare of our clients known as “wards.” The program serves people who have a disabling condition making them unable to make informed decisions about care, treatment, and other life choices. This includes individuals with conditions related to the aging process such as dementia, people with a mental illness, people with developmental disability, people who have had a traumatic brain injury, or people with a physical handicap. As the Public Guardian for Orange and Seminole counties, the individuals appointed by the Courts to Seniors First are generally lacking the ability to pay for a private guardian and have no family or friends available or willing to accept the responsibility. Seniors First seeks private funds to provide clothing, personal care items, durable medical equipment, and dental services not covered through Medicaid and Medicare.

      Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
      Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

      • Medical and daily living needs are met.
      • Clients live in the least restrictive environment appropriate.
      • Protection of the clients’ assets for only their care and needs.
      Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

      Protect the rights and welfare of clients for their enhanced quality of life. Prevention of abuse, neglect and exploitation.


       


       


       


       
      Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

      Each program has specific performance measures and outcomes identified. Success is monitored by the Courts and Dept. of Elder Affairs, Statewide Public Guardianship Office.


       

      Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

      Pam was a highly skilled nurse at the hospital when a car crash in 1988 changed her life forever. She survived the accident, but 49-year-old Pam was a non-responsive quadriplegic in need of 24 hour skilled nursing care. Her first guardian was her father; he was a great dad who attended to Pam’s every need for 18 years. No longer able to care for his daughter, Pam’s elderly father turned over her guardianship to Seniors First in 2005. The Guardianship Program assigned a Case Manager to Pam to oversee her care at the nursing home. She was kept clean and fed, but it didn’t go unnoticed that Pam was still "in there" somewhere, even though she couldn’t verbalize anything. In March 2015, Seniors First facilitated Pam’s participation in a research project with the University of Central Florida to explore if new speech therapy methods could improve her communication with caregivers. And, guess what – it did! Pam was trained to use a non-verbal tool to respond to questions with a yes/no response. Such a simple act has significantly improved Pam’s quality of life. As the public guardian for Orange and Seminole counties, Seniors First is charged with taking care of the person and property of its incapacitated clients. It is our mission work to help achieve the highest quality of life possible in the least restrictive setting for those individuals in our care.

      Description
      Senior Tran addresses the transportation needs of the City of Orlando's senior citizens living in the downtown area. Transportation is key to their independence.
       
      Seniors First is contracted by the City of Orlando Community Redevelopment Agency to provide Senior Tran, which operates three days a week using two buses each of which provides three round trips daily.  Bus service is available to residents of 11 downtown building housing senior citizens providing round trip transportation from those buildings to stops on a fixed route including the grocery store, shopping center, pharmacy, and library. Seniors First staff assist passengers with loading and unloading from the bus, handling shopping packages and accessing their buildings, if necessary. Service is compliant with Americans with Disabilities Act.
      Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled
      Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. With each bus trip, senior citizens are able to overcome transportation barriers to accessing resources to meet their basic daily living needs at home and engage in community life.
      Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Over time, transportation services help senior citizens with functional limitations remain living independently in the downtown Orlando area which enhances their quality of life at home.
      Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Success is monitored by client satisfaction surveys, administrative reporting, and outside monitoring by Community Redevelopment Agency of the City of Orlando
      Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Sylvia is one of about 150 regular riders, and a typical client living in a downtown Orlando senior hi-rise building who plans her activities around the Senior Tran schedule.  Sylvia starts the day with a one-way trip to Panera Bread to enjoy breakfast and reading the newspaper. Next, she takes a one-way trip to Public for grocery shopping, and on the third, and final, bus run of the day she arrives at home with her groceries for the week. Helping senior citizens like Sylvia gain access to resources to meet her daily living needs and to engage in community life, enhances the quality of community for all ages.
      Description

      The Neighborhood Lunch Program addresses senior isolation and hunger by providing critical socialization in a congregate setting for mobile seniors. Poor nutrition and social support are root causes of a deteriorating quality of life that can lead to the need for long term care for older adults.

       

      The Neighborhood Lunch Program will serve nearly 100,000 meals this year to nourish mobile seniors and help them feel connected within their own neighborhoods. A hot lunch is provided Monday through Friday at 11 neighborhood sites (donated space) across Orange County. Daily activities include socialization, educational and health presentations, exercise, shopping trips and games.

       
      Transportation is a key component to this program. Vans provide roundtrip transportation to lunch sites, and give all clients access to community resources (grocery, pharmacy, etc.) to meet their basic daily living needs and to engage in community life. Neighborhood Lunch program serves vulnerable seniors who rely on its vital safety net to remain healthier and independent in their own homes.
       
      Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled
      Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
      • Reduced food insecurity and nutritional risks (under nourishment)
      • Improved nutritional intake
      • Increased social connections
      • Increased activities and mental stimulation
      • Improved access to community resources through transportation
      Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Increase the level of independence and capacity to remain at home, with better health through improved nutrition, reduced isolation and access to community resources.
      Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

      Each program has specific performance measures and outcomes identified. Success is monitored by client surveys, administrative review, and outside monitoring by Dept. of Elder Affairs, Heart of Florida United Way and Orange County Government.

      Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

      Sharon moved to Orlando from Cincinnati to live with her daughter following the death of her husband of 46 years. Her daughter’s family welcomed Sharon to their home, but the family budget was stretched tightly. Sharon, like many seniors, was not regularly eating balanced meals – she was “getting by.” She was lonely for people her own age and depressed. Sharon saw the Seniors First van drive through her neighborhood and contacted us. Now at the East Orange Community Center, Sharon enjoys the hot lunch meal five days each week. Sharon says she really enjoys the fresh vegetables, especially the dark leafy greens, because she can’t afford to buy them. On her first day at the Neighborhood Lunch program, Sharon met Connie whose outgoing personality immediately made her feel welcome. Sharon and Connie continue to sit together for lunch and play bingo or dominoes. 72-year-old Sharon says she is no longer depressed and looks forward each day to going to her neighborhood lunch. Improved nutrition and social connections and activities are helping Sharon enhance her well-being and enjoyment of life. The Seniors First van that first caught Sharon’s attention has helped her overcome transportation barriers to grocery, pharmacy and other shopping and activities.

      Comments
      CEO Comments Seniors First has enhanced the quality of life for Central Florida’s seniors by maintaining their independence and dignity.  With a case managed package of services, care plans are tailored to meet the specific needs of each client thus allowing them the choice of being able to remain comfortably and safely in their own homes for as long as possible.
           Unfortunately, programs that help older Americans live independently in their own homes and out of nursing homes have not kept pace with the needs of this population. Across the nation more and more individuals are already on waiting lists for home and community based services. Specifically, in Orange and Seminole Counties, about 1,800 seniors are currently waiting for in-home services.  There are more than 400 seniors on a waiting list for both Meals on Wheels and Neighborhood Lunch programs in Orange County. Seniors First is committed to offering more resources for older adults, keeping people out of nursing homes and helping to save the state money which is a message we want legislators to hear and understand.
           Our mission is to help seniors like Lula, a 91-year-old who enjoys her Orlando home.  Arthritis and a leg injury almost forced her to consider moving to a nursing home as it became more difficult to take care of herself and her home.  Eventually, Lula heard about Seniors First, and that, she says, has made all the difference.  With help from Seniors First she now receives daily meals, assistance with bathing, a homemaker who changes her bedding, helps with laundry and makes sure her house is tidy.  “These are things that help me stay here instead of being in a nursing home,” she says. “I’m so thankful for what they do for me.”
      Board Chair
      Board Chair Larry Stewart
      Company Affiliation Seaside National Bank & Trust
      Term Jan 2017 to Dec 2019
      Board Co-Chair
      Board Co-Chair
      Board
      Board Members
      NameCompany AffiliationsStatusCertificate*
      Gordon Arkin Past ChairFoley & LardnerVoting
      Kathleen Black Dr. Phillips HospitalVoting
      Kim Blaylock & BarrVoting
      Edward Casoria Attorney - private practiceVoting
      Derren Ciaglia Lowndes, Drosdick, Doser, Kantor & Reed, PA
      Carol Clark Orange County GovernmentVoting
      Scott Clark Leading Edge Health Care
      Steven Fisher TreasurerTD BankVoting
      John Gay 2nd Vice ChairCresa PartnersVoting
      Michelle Hage Community VolunteerVoting
      Jerry Kassab Aspire Healthcare, Inc.Voting
      Bruce Marin Foley & LardnerVoting
      Craig Moore Florida Hospital Home Care Svc.
      Melvin Pittman SecretaryOrange County Community & Environmental Services- RetiredVoting
      Allison Ramirez ROC Senior Housing Fund, LLCVoting
      Margaret Sauer 1st Vice ChairCommunity VolunteerVoting
      Sol Schick Solomon F. Schick & Associates
      Jim Shapiro RetiredVoting
      Larry Stewart PresidentSeaside National Bank & TrustVoting
      *This individual has been awarded a Certificate in Orientation to Board Service by the Edyth Bush Institute for Philanthropy & Nonprofit Leadership at Rollins College ebi.rollins.edu, the Central Florida Partnership www.centralfloridapartnership.org, and the Central Florida Foundation www.cffound.org.
      Board Term Lengths 2
      Board Term Limits 5
      Board Ethnicity
      Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
      Caucasian 15
      Hispanic/Latino 1
      Native American/American Indian 0
      Other 0
      Other (if specified) 0
      Policies
      Written Board Selection Criteria No
      Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
      Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
      Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
      Constituency Includes Client Representation No
      Standing Committees
      Standing Committees
      Committee Name
      Executive
      Nominating
      Finance
      Development
      Comments
      CEO Comments

      Seniors First, Inc. is a Florida non-profit corporation (“Seniors First”). The governance structure of Seniors First consists of a President, who also serves as the Executive Director, and a Board of Directors currently comprised of 19 volunteers. The Board of Directors has the traditional structure of a Board Chair, two Vice Chairs, Secretary, and a Treasurer. All members of the Board of Directors serve on one or more of the working committees, such as executive, finance, nominating, and development.

      Seniors First strives for ethnic, cultural and age diversity in identifying and selecting members of the Board of Directors. This is important in helping Seniors First to understand the needs of its clients.

      Seniors First follows a modified Carver model of Board governance. At our regular meetings of the Board, the senior staff updates the members on the progress of the many programs operated by Seniors First, its financial condition and issues at the national and state level that might impact on our programs. The Board meets formally six times a year. The Executive Committee, which is comprised of the CEO, Chairman of the Board, Vice Chairs, Secretary, Treasurer, past Chairman, and four at-large members meet in the months when there is not a full Board meeting. Special meetings are called when necessary.

      This year, the Board of Directors will be working on building a strategic fundraising plan that is currently under development, which will focus, in part, on increasing non-governmental sources of funding for its important programs, community awareness, and optimizing agency operations to provide quality services. Seniors First will be using the senior hunger documentary, "Leftovers," completed in June 2015, through a CF Foundation grant, this year to educate and engage our community to increase support for Seniors First meal programs. In 2016, Seniors First will mark its 50th anniversary.
       
      CEO/Executive Director
      CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Marsha L. Lorenz
      Term Start Aug 2008
      Email mlorenz@seniorsfirstinc.org
      Experience Marsha Lorenz was appointed as the President/CEO of Seniors First, Inc. in August of 2008.  She was the Executive Director of the Visiting Nurse Association of Central Florida, Inc. / Community Care for the Elderly since 1995 which combined with Seniors First, Inc. effective 1/01/09.  Ms. Lorenz directs all corporate operations of the multiple Federal and State grant programs and provides leadership, accountability and oversight for a planned system of efficient, cost effective and consumer responsive services.

      Prior to serving older adults, Ms. Lorenz worked in a variety of settings including drug and alcohol treatment, children services and medical social work. She has an undergraduate degree in Social Work from Ohio State University and a Masters degree in Guidance and Counseling from Rollins College. Ms. Lorenz also has extensive knowledge of care management, home health care and community based service systems.

      Her previous and current volunteer leadership activities include: past chair and current committee member of the Heart of Florida United Way Council of Agency Professionals, a member of the Florida Council on Aging and Florida Association of Service Providers as well as the past president of the Florida Community Care for the Elderly Coalition.
      CEO Salary Range $100,001 - $125,000
      Former CEOs
      Former CEOs
      NameStartEnd
      Randall Hunt Apr 2002June 2007
      Susan Spitz Oct 1994Nov 2001
      Staff
      Number of Full Time Staff 60
      Number of Part Time Staff 75
      Number of Volunteers 750
      Number of Contract Staff 0
      Staff Retention Rate 85%
      Senior Staff
      Title Chief Operating Officer
      Experience/Biography
      Lisa Whaley joined Seniors First, Inc. in May of 2106.  She has over 20 years' experience in the Orlando nonprofit and association sectors.  Ms. Whaley is responsible for agency operations including six departments providing services to Central Florida seniors.
       
      Prior to joining Seniors First, Ms. Whaley had several management roles at the Institute of Internal Auditors for almost 10 years.  While at the IIA, she directed the operations of its top-tier membership program serving Fortune 500 chief audit executives.  Before the IIA, she was community relations and volunteer director at Community Care for the Elderly prior to its merge with Seniors First. 
       
      Ms. Whaley has an undergraduate degree in Psychology from Stetson University and a Master's degree in Public Administration from the University of Central Florida.
       
       
       
      Title *consultant - see note in staff experience
      Experience/Biography

      Note:  Dawn Phelps, our previous CFO for the past 2 years, has left Seniors First in early March 2017.  She will remain on a consultant basis until our new CFO begins employment. 

      Dawn Phelps joined Seniors First in March 2015, bringing 15+ years experience working with nonprofit organizations in Central Florida, including 10 years in the role of CFO. She has managed budgets in excess of $10 million, managed capital campaigns in excess of $15 million, and has administered HFUW and County CRP funding for the Central Florida YMCA. A native of Orlando, Ms. Phelps received her bachelor’s degree in Finance from UCF.
      Title V.P. of Client Care Programs
      Experience/Biography
           Maura Hassey joined Seniors First in the fall of 2003, bringing with her over 16 years of case management experience.  Prior to joining Seniors First, Maura was with Hope and Help Center. Her professional case management expertise is with various populations to include individuals infected or affected by AIDS, the Aged, and Refugee populations throughout the world.     
           From 1986-1990, Ms Hassey served as a Captain in the U.S. Army. She is a committee member of Senior Resource Alliance's Aged and Disabled Resource Center local work group and the Orange County Commission on Aging Community Partnership.   
           Ms Hassey holds a bachelor's degree in Criminology and a master's degree in Health Management.
      Title Vice President of Human Resources
      Experience/Biography   Debi Williams is Vice President of Human Resources. She joined Seniors First, Inc. in 2002 as Director of Administration and was promoted into key human resource management roles as Vice President of Human Resources in 2004.  With over 19 years of Human Resources experience Debi is responsible for the design and implementation of the HR policies and procedures throughout the agency. Ms. Williams received an accounting degree from West Virginia Junior College , in Morgantown, West Virginia . She is a member of the Nonprofit Human Resources Association.
      Other
      Collaborations
      Seniors First is able to provide direct services more efficiently through collaboration with a vast array of organizations, only a few of which will be mentioned here.  Donated space to operate our 8 Meals on Wheels sites and 14 Neighborhood Lunch Program locations (City/County Buildings, churches, and high rises in Orlando, Winter Park & Orange County). Individuals, hospitals, physician offices, etc. that donate durable medical equipment. An army of volunteers from the community, corporations and faith groups that collaborate to collect and deliver holiday gifts and meals so no client is forgotten. Social Work interns from UCF that provide case management services. Heart of Florida United Way 2-1-1 and Elder Hotline client referrals.


      Affiliations
      AffiliationYear
      AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals)2000
      United Way Member Agency1995
      National Council on Aging1998
      Meals on Wheels Association of America1998
      Chamber of Commerce1998
      CEO Comments
           The Carver Governance Model that has been in place since 4/25/01, authorizes the CEO and Senior Leadership to develop policies and procedures for the daily operations. The executive committee of the board regularly reviews compliance with the established Executive Limitations (EL's)  under this model to assure protection of the agency and achievement of organizational goals.
      State Registration Yes
      State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
      State Charitable Solicitations Permit Expiration Month Nov
      State Charitable Solicitations Permit Expiration Year 2017
      Fiscal Year
      Fiscal Year Start Jan 01, 2017
      Fiscal Year End Dec 31, 2017
      Documents
      Form 990s
      YearDocument
      2015990
      2014990
      2013990 Signature Page
      2013990
      2012990
      2012990 signature
      2011990 signature page
      2011990
      2010990
      2009990
      20082008 Form 990
      2008VNA 990
      2007Form 990
      2007VNA 990
      2006Form 990
      2006VNA 990
      2005Form 990
      IRS Letter of Determination
      501 (c) 3
      Detailed Financials
      Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
      Fiscal Year201520142013
      Foundation and
      Corporation Contributions
      $245,799$291,652$196,068
      Government Contributions$0$0$0
      Federal$0$0$0
      State$0$0$0
      Local$0$0$0
      Unspecified$0$0$0
      Individual Contributions$113,578$28,958$67,337
      $140,382$141,761$141,624
      $7,937,236$6,969,019$6,979,481
      Investment Income, Net of Losses$1,089$2,595$8,385
      Membership Dues$0$0$0
      Special Events$193,132$178,562$191,304
      Revenue In-Kind$27,282$26,800$27,587
      Other$26,742$37,313$27,039
      Expense Allocations
      Fiscal Year201520142013
      Program Expense$7,345,236$6,318,136$6,350,424
      Administration Expense$1,175,710$1,103,357$1,027,207
      Fundraising Expense$123,196$135,098$135,053
      Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
      Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.001.021.02
      Program Expense/Total Expenses85%84%85%
      Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue18%21%23%
      Assets and Liabilities
      Fiscal Year201520142013
      Total Assets$4,636,134$4,650,777$4,575,920
      Current Assets$2,383,954$2,423,518$2,095,952
      Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
      Current Liabilities$870,308$926,049$971,318
      Total Net Assets$3,765,826$3,724,728$3,604,602
      Top Funding Sources
      Fiscal Year201520142013
      Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountEarned Revenue $7,937,236Earned Revenue $6,969,019Earned Revenue $6,979,481
      Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountFoundations and Corporations $245,799Foundations and Corporations $291,652Foundations and Corporations $263,405
      Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountSpecial Events $193,132Special Events $178,562Special Events $191,304
      Solvency
      Short Term Solvency
      Fiscal Year201520142013
      Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities2.742.622.16
      Long Term Solvency
      Fiscal Year201520142013
      Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
      Capital Campaign
      Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
      Comments
      CEO Comments
      Foundation Comments
      Financial figures taken from IRS Form 990. 
      Audit is consolidated and therefore balance sheet data is based on IRS 990.
      Prior to 2009, 990s and audits were filed separately for Seniors First and Visiting Nurses Association.  990s and audits for Seniors First and Visiting Nurses Association that are posted separately above.
      Endowment is held at the Central Florida Foundation.
       
      Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster
      Notes Programs listed here are those that are only activated during a disaster. Some organizations have unified budgeting and do not budget by program. Because of this, some budget fields may be blank or represent an approximation. Organization describes previous experience during the immediate response, recovery or rebuilding phases following a disaster.