Orlando Community & Youth Trust, Inc.
595 N Primrose Dr
Orlando FL 32803
Contact Information
Address 595 N Primrose Dr
Orlando, FL 32803
Phone (407) 246-4320
Fax (407) 246-4038
Web and Social Media
Donate with a credit card http://orlandotrust.org/
Video
Mission
Mission
The Orlando Community & Youth Trust, Inc. (OCYT) supports the mission of the City of Orlando Department of Families, Parks and Recreation (FPR). It is FPR's fundraising entity, leveraging grants and philanthropic support that enhance the quality of life of youth, families, and senior citizens living in the City of Orlando.  Example of programs supported by OCYT include after school, academic, arts and athletic programs serving children residing in the City's most disadvantaged neighborhoods, and programs that support the environment, including the acquisition, development and improvement of public park land and the planting and protection of trees.
 
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Brenda March
Board Chair Ms. Lisa C. Early
Board Chair Company Affiliation City of Orlando
History
IRS Ruling Year 1996
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expense Bar Graph
 
 
Projected Revenue $1,188,529.81
Projected Expenses $1,194,713.48
Statements
Mission
The Orlando Community & Youth Trust, Inc. (OCYT) supports the mission of the City of Orlando Department of Families, Parks and Recreation (FPR). It is FPR's fundraising entity, leveraging grants and philanthropic support that enhance the quality of life of youth, families, and senior citizens living in the City of Orlando.  Example of programs supported by OCYT include after school, academic, arts and athletic programs serving children residing in the City's most disadvantaged neighborhoods, and programs that support the environment, including the acquisition, development and improvement of public park land and the planting and protection of trees.
 
Impact
Top Accomplishments for FY16-17:
 
1. OCYT met and exceeded its revenue targets this fiscal year, raising approximately $893,508.00 for programs and facilities that improve the quality of life of Orlando's youth, families, and seniors.
2. OCYT successfully transitioned the Dueling Dragons of Orlando to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Florida.
3. OCYT hired ## youth this year, ## as employees and 26 as Summer VISTAS.
4. For FYE 09/30/2017 we once again will have a clean audit. This represents the fifth consecutive year of no significant audit findings.
 
Top Goal for FY17-18:
 
1. Continue to raise funds to achieve the mission of the organization, including increasing fundraising revenues through existing and new events and successfully landing grants through focused grant writing efforts. 
 
Independent Research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or program effectiveness? Yes
Needs
  1. Grant and donor funding of approximately $800,000 to support the enhancement of Orlando's Families, Parks and Recreation programs and facilities.
  2. Gifts in-kind that can be distributed to needy children and families in Orlando, including school supplies, furnishings, clothing, canned foods, event/venue tickets, and baby items.
  3. Corporate partners willing to employ City youth at their work-sites.
Background
The Orlando Community & Youth Trust, Inc. was created in 1994 to leverage and administer public and private grant and philanthropic funding to support the mission of the City of Orlando Department of Families, Parks, and Recreation, "to enhance the quality of life of youth, families and senior citizens living in the City of Orlando." To achieve its mission, the Department operates a wide range of public programs and facilities, including afterschool and summer camps for children, 16 community centers, a pottery studio, 2 senior centers, an environmental center, 11 community pools, learn-to-swim and adult fitness programs, over 100 public parks including Lake Eola Park and Bill Frederick Park at Turkey Lake, tree planting and neighborhood green-up programs, public ball fields, tennis and basketball courts, youth athletic programs, and the City's Parramore Kidz Zone program.
 
City staff provide their services to the Trust pro bono, thereby reducing the Trust's staffing and administrative costs.  This allows the Trust to direct most revenues to the enhancement of the public's families, parks and recreation programs and facilities.
NTEE Information
Primary Organization Type Youth Development
Primary Organization SubType Youth Development Programs
Secondary Organization Type Environment
Secondary Organiztion SubType Botanical, Horticultural & Landscape Services
Tertiary Organization Type Recreation & Sports
Tertiary Organization SubType Community Recreational Centers
Areas Served
Geographic Areas Served
FL - Orange
The primary geographic area served is the City of Orlando and its residents.
Goals
HelpWhat is the organization aiming to accomplish? This is the organization's ultimate goal for intended impact.
Each of the programs that OCYT supports has its own goals, and systems for tracking and reporting achievement of those goals. An example, from Parramore Kidz Zone, is offered below:
 
Parramore Kidz Zone (PKZ) aims to "move the needle" on juvenile crime, teen pregnancies and educational achievement in Orlando’s highest poverty neighborhood. PKZ engages Parramore’s children, from birth to age 24, in cradle-to-career programs that support their academic, social, and economic success, offered by a coalition of non-profit, government, faith, business and civic partners.
 
During the most recent year for which data is available, 1,431 youth participated in PKZ, including 555 who participated in after-school/academic assistance programs; 472 in health and wellness programs; 329 in youth development programs for teenagers and young adults; and 78 in college access programs. In addition, 320 Parramore infants, toddlers and preschoolers participated in early childhood education programs; 113 teenagers and young adults were employed; and 117 children’s families benefited from PKZ’s economic stabilization program.
 
PKZ’s results have been extraordinary, documented in several national journal articles and reports and include: A 66% reduction in juvenile arrests in Parramore since PKZ was launched and a 73% decline in teen births in Parramore. With regard to academic achievement, during the most recent year 100% of PKZ 12th graders graduated high school and enrolled in college.
 
Strategies
HelpWhat are the organization's strategies for its stated long-term goals? OCYT is able to leverage a strong relationship with the City of Orlando and strategically invest community, grant and philanthropic support in the City’s Families, Parks and Recreation (FPR) programs and facilities because, by virtue of its By-Laws, several Board positions, including the Board Chair, must be comprised of senior leadership of the City’s FPR Department. This also leverages significant City staff support provided in-kind to OCYT. In the near term, the key building block for future success will be to improve capacity to leverage and administer increasingly complex sources of funding by adding and reorganizing City staff in the areas of grant writing, grant fiscal/contractual management, donor development, and marketing.
Capabilities
HelpWhat are the organization’s capabilities for doing this? What resources, capacities, and connections support its progress towards long-term goals? OCYT is able to accomplish these goals because it can count on a vast array of resources provided to it by the City of Orlando, Department of Families, Parks and Recreation (FPR). FPR operates Orlando's public parks, recreation facilities and programs, including more than 120 parks, 17 recreation centers, 2 senior centers, 11 pools, numerous public ball fields, tennis courts, gyms, playgrounds, fishing piers, as well as a wide range of public benefit programs, such as youth after school, arts and athletics programs. The FPR department has operated youth programs for nearly 50 years, including a long and distinguished record of serving the City's low income community. In addition to access to all of these resources, OCYT receives comprehensive managerial, technical, and administrative FPR staff, in-kind and at no cost, as well as access to the broad relationships the City has with corporate, non-profit, faith and public partners throughout Orlando.
Indicators
HelpHow will the organization know if it is making progress? What are the key qualitative and quantitative indicators against which the organization assesses its progress toward its intended impact? OCYT tracks progress against annual goals established by the City of Orlando's Families, Parks and Recreation Department in a variety of areas including the number of individuals served, by program, location and frequency; number of trees donated and planted; number of community events hosted/attendance by site; and so forth. Progress against goals is tracked via several databases, including CLASS, Social Solutions/ETO, and Tree Keeper. Staff that operations programs enters data daily into respective databases and assesses and reports trends in program utilization on a regular basis. If a program is not meeting goals (e.g. low enrollment in the after school program at a community center), staff and management meet to develop and implement strategies to address the problem. Some OCYT programs track and report outcomes/impact in addition to outputs. In most instances, outcomes are defined via funding agreements. For instance, in addition to tracking program attendance, the Parramore Kidz Zone (PKZ) program utilizes the Social Solutions database to track and report participant GPAs, attendance, juvenile arrests, and teen pregnancies. Staff who works directly with participants set individual goals with participants and adjusts interventions with the respective participant when achievement falls below goals. PKZ also compiles data for all participants combined, and for the entire Parramore neighborhood, and if program or neighborhood level goals are not being met, staff and management meet to develop and implement strategies to address the problem.
Progress
HelpWhat has and hasn’t been accomplished so far? OCYT's mission is to support the operations of the City's FPR Department, contributing an estimated 10% of the total budget. Outputs are reported for the department and include: Recreation Division: The Division’s 17 recreation centers accommodated attendance of 1,434,394 last year. In addition, public and private groups rented the facilities 5,449 days bringing 165,617 attendees to meetings/events. Recreation held its annual Summer Showcase at the Dr. Phillips Performing Arts Center on July 27, 20167. Over 500 youth ages 5-14 participated from 16 community center summer programs. Attendance at our 11 pools reached 38,427 visits. Attendance at the Pottery Studio increased to 31,731, where classes continued to sell out and often have waiting lists. Attendance at Orlando Tennis Centre: 30,625 visits/year, including a free tennis lesson program for 3 hours each Sunday in April, May, November and December funded by grants from USTA, USPTA, PGA Tour Superstore and Held Kids Play Sports. Attendance at Orlando Skate Park increased to 11,691 visits and a new shade structure was installed to provide protections against the sun. Parks Division: Maintained 118 parks/green spaces and opened the new Dog Run at Constitute Green Park, Dog Park at Lake Druid; the fitness pod, Drone Zone and the third disk golf course at BFP. Promoted tree planting and increased the City’s tree canopy by: planting 1,370 trees; trimming approximately 2,369 trees; removing 535 trees; and distributing (free to residents) approximately 150 trees at events. Orlando received the Tree City USA award for the 41st consecutive year and Growth Award for the 26th year and the Playful City USA designation for the 9th consecutive year. Logged over 9,854 volunteer hours in over 97 Green Up events to augment services, build community pride, and reduce invasive species and labor costs. Sample outcomes of the department's children's programs include: ASAS serves over 3,600 middle and high school students annually through its various programs. Parramore Kidz Zone outcomes: 90% of K-12 students maintained 2.0+ GPA, 98% were promoted to the next grade level; 100% of seniors graduated high school; at least 85 participants attend college; Juvenile arrests declined 61% in Parramore; Births to girls under age 19 declined 56% in Parramore.
Programs
Description Parramore Kidz Zone aims to "move the needle" on juvenile crime, teen pregnancies and educational achievement in Orlando's highest poverty neighborhood. PKZ engages Parramore's children in programs that support their success, such as pre-k education, youth employment, mentoring and tutoring. The programs are offered by a coalition of non-profit, government, faith, business and civic organizations. During the most recent program year for which data is available, PKZ served 1,134 youth, birth to age 24. Of these, 690 participated in academically-enriched after school programs and 171 participated in programs designed to keep them on track toward high school graduation, college entry and college completion; 493 children under the age of 5 received early learning services; 446 participated in health and wellness programs; 401 older youth participated in youth development programs; and 101 youth were employed. Program evaluators documented a 38% decline in verified cases of child maltreatment, a 56% reduction in teen births; and a 61% reduction in juvenile arrests in Parramore, and 100% of Parramore high school seniors served by PKZ graduated high school in 2017.
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Short term success is determined by the number of children enrolled in PKZ programs, including pre-kindergarten education, mentoring, tutoring, after school activities, youth employment and college access programs, health care, and programs that support family economic stability.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
The goal is to "move the needle" on child well-being in a severely disadvantaged neighborhood where 73% of children live below the Federal poverty line.  The result will be substantial and sustained reductions in the neighborhood's juvenile crime, teen pregnancy, and high school drop out rates.  Ultimately, a "critical mass" of children residing in the "Zone" will transition to well-educated, healthy, successful adulthood.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The program is being evaluated by an external evaluator, the Florida Healthcare Coalition.  Evaluators have conducted a baseline household survey of 100 randomly selected households in Parramore, and will repeat the survey at 5 year intervals to determine if families report a change in conditions.  In addition, data on children's educational performance, juvenile crime and teen pregnancy rates for neighborhood children is reported annually to track trends.
Description OCYT supports the City’s Recreation Division, which offers safe, affordable after school programs and summer camps for over 2,201 children each year at 17 recreation centers. The Recreation Division provided 111,027 meals to children this summer through the Summer Food Service program and 139,555 suppers to children at 17 City locations throughout the school year. 89% of attendees are from low or very low income families. The programs include a diverse array of activities, such as homework time, computer lab, arts and crafts, and fitness. In addition, approximately 165,617 people benefit from the Division's athletics programs and facilities, including youth football, basketball and baseball leagues and more than 100 ballfields, pools, basketball courts, gymnasiums, fitness centers, and tennis courts. OCYT also raises funds to support the two senior centers operated by the Recreation Division. These sites feature a wide range of programming. The Trust supports these programs and facilities by raising dollars to cover the cost of supplies, equipment, special programs, field-trips for children, scholarships and more.
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Elderly and/or Disabled
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
1. Expand hours at four Recreation Centers;
2. Continue successful implementation of 21st Century Community Learning Center grant at 3 sites and explore expansion to additional sites; 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
As a result of participation in these programs, City residents enjoy the benefits of active living and community engagement, leading to improved health and mental health.  In addition, the City's after school and summer programs for children provide parents with safe and affordable places to leave their children while they are at work, improving child safety and family economic well-being.  Finally, after school tutoring, computer access, learn-to-swim programs, athletic training, and other services offered by the Recreation Division support the development of a wide range of skills in City children that will help them be successful in life.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The Recreation Division carefully tracks utilization of each of its programs via its CLASS data system.  Numbers of users are monitored daily, weekly, monthly and annually to inform decision-making regarding allocation of resources.
Description OCYT supports the City’s Parks Division, which manages all public playgrounds and the entire City street tree canopy, as well as 118 parks, including Lake Eola Park. The Trust engages private donors to purchase trees; build, renovate and maintain parks and playgrounds; and even helped renovate the iconic Lake Eola Fountain. The Trust also supports the Orlando Wetlands Festival at the Wetlands Park every year. At this beautiful natural park, with 20 miles of scenic trails, the Festival offers free, interactive activities to the public, including guided birding hikes, animal catch and release demos, live wild animals, and tree giveaways. Also, the Trust has partnered with KaBOOM! to engage community volunteers in the complete renovation – in a single day – of City playgrounds, such as the one at the John H. Jackson Community Center. The Trust plays a key role in meeting the criteria needed for the City of Orlando to qualify as a Playful City USA. This designation emphasizes the City's commitment to providing safe places for children and residents to play. Members of the Trust Board of Directors also serve as the Play Board for the City of Orlando.
Population Served General/Unspecified
Adults
Board Chair
Board Chair Ms. Lisa C. Early
Company Affiliation City of Orlando
Term Jan 2006 to Jan 2020
Board Co-Chair
Board Co-Chair Mr. David Wagg
Company Affiliation City of Orlando
Term Start Nov 2015 Nov 2020
Board
Board Members
NameCompany AffiliationsStatusCertificate*
Mr. Chirag Bhavsar CNL BankVoting
Ms. Lisa C. Early City of OrlandoVoting
Ms. Yvette Hart-Metzger Celestial's Legacy CorporationVoting
Ms. Renee Jackson City of Orlando FPR Fiscal ManagerVoting
Mr. Michael Lawrence Office of CommunicationsVoting
Mrs. Kim N. V. Le Orlando HealthVoting
Ms. Jae Nale Orange CountyVoting
Mr. David Wagg City of Orlando - Parks DivisionVoting
Mr. Rodney Williams City of OrlandoVoting
*This individual has been awarded a Certificate in Orientation to Board Service by the Edyth Bush Institute for Philanthropy & Nonprofit Leadership at Rollins College ebi.rollins.edu,
Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 2
Board Ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islander 2
Caucasian 3
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0
Other (if specified) 0
Policies
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy No
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 58%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No
Standing Committees
Standing Committees
Committee Name
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Board Governance
CEO/Executive Director
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Brenda March
Term Start Jan 2005
Email brenda.march@cityoforlando.net
Experience Ms. March serves as the Children & Education Program Manager for the City of Orlando's Families, Parks & Recreation Department. Born and raised in Orlando, Ms. March brings over 23 years of experience to the Trust, especially in the areas of program management, community organizing, and public relations. Ms. March has developed and led a lengthy list of programs during her 20 years of employment with the City of Orlando, including the Mayor’s Matching Grants program, Citizen Corps, and Neighborhood and Community Plans, and has also been appointed by the Mayor to facilitate numerous task forces, committees and community relation initiatives to inform and engage Orlando citizens in municipal government.
CEO Salary Range $0 - $50,000
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 5
Number of Contract Staff 0
Plans
Organization has Fundraising Plan? No
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Date Strategic Plan Adopted Nov 2013
Management Succession Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Other
Collaborations The Orlando Community and Youth Trust, Inc. collaborates with a wide range of organizations including but not limited to: New Image Youth Center Inc.; Orange County Early Learning Coalition; Heart of Florida United Way; Bank of America; Enterprise Foundation; State of Florida; Florida Health Care Coalition; Florida Department of Agriculture; Division of Forestry for the State of Florida; St. Johns River Water Management District; and Department of Environmental Protection.
Awards
AwardAwarding OrganizationYear
Children's Initiative DesignationState of Florida2009
Playful City, USAKaBOOM!2012
Tree City USAArbor Day Foundation2012
All-American City Award (Finalist)National Civic League2012
City Spirit AwardFlorida League of Cities2008
40th Consecutive YearTree City USA2016
25th Consecutive Year - Growth AwardTree City USA - Growth Award2016
Playful City DesignationPlayful City USA2016
2016 National Education Pathways with a Purpose AwardU.S. Conference of Mayors/USA Funds2016
2016 Let's Move! Cities, Towns and Counties Most Dedicated Local Elected Official AwardNational League of Cities2016
41st Consecutive YearTree City USA2017
26th Consecutive Year - Growth AwardTree City USA - Growth Award2017
Playful City Designation - 9th Consecutive YearPlayful City USA 2017
Model Program - 7th Consecutive YearFL-DOE 21st CCLC Department 2017
Powell Legacy AwardGeneral and Mrs. Colin L. Powell2017
State Registration Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Expiration Month Jan
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Expiration Year 2018
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start Oct 01, 2017
Fiscal Year End Sept 30, 2018
Documents
Form 990s
YearDocument
2016990
2015990
2014Form 990
2013990
2012990
2011990
2010990
2009990
2008990
2007990
2006990
Audit Documents
YearDocument
2016Audit
2016Management Ltr.
2015Audit
20142014 Audit Documents
2013Audit
2012Audit
2011Audit
2011Management Letter
2011Board Letter
2010Audit
2009Audit
2008Audit
2007Audit
IRS Letter of Determination
IRS Designation Letter
Other Financial Documents
YearDocument
2017OCYT Financial Statement
Detailed Financials
Expense Allocations
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$905,648$1,515,386$597,224
Administration Expense$26,463$10,210$18,902
Fundraising Expense$0$0$0
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.140.891.13
Program Expense/Total Expenses97%99%97%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$624,746$506,206$607,929
Current Assets$624,746$505,789$605,512
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$17,376$27,390$0
Total Net Assets$607,370$478,816$607,929
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountFoundations, Corporations and Individuals $909,502Foundations, Corporations and Individuals $1,241,020Individuals $516,333
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountSpecial Events $109,590Special Events $113,579Special Events $156,263
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountOther $28,655In-Kind $8,496In-Kind $20,904
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities35.9518.47--
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
CEO Comments
Foundation Comments
Financial figures taken from IRS Form 990s. 
2011, 2010: Contributions from foundations and corporations are included in total for individuals, as they were not separated on the IRS form 990.
Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster
Notes Programs listed here are those that are only activated during a disaster. Some organizations have unified budgeting and do not budget by program. Because of this, some budget fields may be blank or represent an approximation. Organization describes previous experience during the immediate response, recovery or rebuilding phases following a disaster.
Nonprofit Orlando Community & Youth Trust, Inc.
Address 595 N Primrose Dr
Orlando, FL 32803
Primary Phone (407) 246-4320
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Brenda March
Board Chair Ms. Lisa C. Early
Board Chair Company Affiliation City of Orlando
Year of Incorporation 1996