Hearing Loss Association of Lakeland
5337 N. Socrum Loop Rd.
Suite 237
Lakeland FL 33809-4256
Contact Information
Address 5337 N. Socrum Loop Rd.
Suite 237
Lakeland, FL 33809 4256
Phone (863) 853-3130
Web and Social Media
Donate with a credit card http://www.hla-lakeland.org
Video
Mission
Mission

Our mission is to help each other deal with our hearing loss.

We are the local chapter of the Hearing Loss Association of America, which is the nation’s foremost membership organization in promoting hearing loss advocacy, education and support.


The Hearing Loss Association of America, Lakeland Chapter, is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to facilitating sessions where members can help each other to improve our hearing through:


Education Our monthly meetings often feature expert guest speakers to keep us up to date on the latest hearing devices, treatments and other support resources in the community. The upcoming meeting is previewed on our website home page.


Support We provide group discussions and one-on-one opportunities so every member can get the support they need. Our selection of free brochures and flyers, plus our experienced members, will help to identify many of the wonderful resources our community offers from a list of doctors and audiologists to suppliers of free phones and other services.


Advocacy We promote hearing rights and access throughout our community. Our current lead projects are our Hearing Aid Recycling Program and to advocate for hearing loops within the Lakeland area. For more details, check out our website. We are also promoting captioning at playhouses, movies and other appropriate venues.

Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Elaine Goddard
Board Chair Ms. Elaine Goddard
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired
History
IRS Ruling Year 2012
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $23,000.00
Projected Expenses $13,000.00
Statements
Mission

Our mission is to help each other deal with our hearing loss.

We are the local chapter of the Hearing Loss Association of America, which is the nation’s foremost membership organization in promoting hearing loss advocacy, education and support.


The Hearing Loss Association of America, Lakeland Chapter, is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to facilitating sessions where members can help each other to improve our hearing through:


Education Our monthly meetings often feature expert guest speakers to keep us up to date on the latest hearing devices, treatments and other support resources in the community. The upcoming meeting is previewed on our website home page.


Support We provide group discussions and one-on-one opportunities so every member can get the support they need. Our selection of free brochures and flyers, plus our experienced members, will help to identify many of the wonderful resources our community offers from a list of doctors and audiologists to suppliers of free phones and other services.


Advocacy We promote hearing rights and access throughout our community. Our current lead projects are our Hearing Aid Recycling Program and to advocate for hearing loops within the Lakeland area. For more details, check out our website. We are also promoting captioning at playhouses, movies and other appropriate venues.

Impact

Over the past year, our chapter has funded two loop installations, funded one teacher for the SKI-HI Certification Program, donated to a local Speech and Hearing Center, covered the cost of two members to complete HLAA training programs, started work on our new Hearing Aid Network web application and received 3 grants for our new hearing aid program for children aged birth-to-6.

Our fiscal year begins in a couple of weeks, so our goals for the 2017-2018 fiscal year are to finance another teacher for the SKI-HI Certification program, which will allow the teacher to assist with children birth-to-6; assist with the looping of 3-5 venues; acquire new hearing aids to provide to those who are financially challenged and children birth-to-6; implement our new Hearing Aid Network, which allows Auidologists/HIS/HAS to view our donated hearing aid inventory and make requests (hearing aids are given at no cost) and hold our annual Hearing Wellness Expo, which will be March 3, 2018.

Independent Research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or program effectiveness?
Needs

Our needs are mostly for our Advocacy Programs:

• $8,000 for our Looping Program

• $800 for our Captioning Program

• $6,500 for our Hearing Aid Recycling Program

• $1,500 for SKI-HI Certification Program

• $20,000 for our new Hearing Aid for children birth-to-6 program


Background
The Lakeland Chapter began in April 2012. The Central Florida Speech and Hearing Center had moved to a new facility with a community room, which they looped. The organization wished to establish a local chapter of the Hearing Loss Association and assigned 5 employees to begin the process. These people wrote the initial bylaws and became the founding members of the Chapter. Upon completion of the appropriate application, bylaws and other documentation, the first meeting was held in April with 7 members attending.
Membership grew to 15 members by June and a five member planning committee was created to assume fiduciary responsibilities, serve as Chapter leadership, manage the Chapter meetings, etc. One member of the planning committee was elected chairman.
A budget was developed and July 1 was established  as the beginning of our fiscal year.
The Chapter moved on to establish advocacy priorities in line with our mission. Our primary program is "Looping," followed by "Captioning." The Chapter received 3 grants for "Looping" during the first year of existence and provided financial assistance to complete 11 Looping projects (pharmacy, libraries, meeting room, university auditorium, etc.) The Chapter has applied for additional grants to acquire Aural Rehabilitation software and money to provide hearing aids to those whose hearing loss inhibits securing or maintaining employment.
CEO Statement Our chapter is one of the most active chapters in the Hearing Loss Association (about 190 chapters around the country). This is because of our advocacy program which reflects our concern and determination to assist people who have a hearing loss in our community. While we have several advocacy programs in place or getting started, we have a few more ideas that are in the planning stages. There are over 30,000 people in our area that have hearing loss and we seek to make an impact.
NTEE Information
Primary Organization Type Human Services
Primary Organization SubType Deaf/Hearing Impaired Centers, Services
Secondary Organization Type Human Services
Secondary Organiztion SubType Human Services
Areas Served
Geographic Areas Served
FL - Polk
Lakeland, Florida and surrounding counties (Polk, Hillsborough)
Goals
HelpWhat is the organization aiming to accomplish? This is the organization's ultimate goal for intended impact. To serve our local community and to help the hard of hearing through education, advocacy and support. Our goals are to increase our Chapter membership by 50% over the next two years, raise funds to send one or two Chapter members to the annual HLAA conference, and to secure Grants to advance our advocacy programs.
Strategies
HelpWhat are the organization's strategies for its stated long-term goals? To increase our membership, we will sponsor an annual "Hearing Wellness Expo," participate in at least 3 Health Fairs each year, and conduct an annual membership mailing campaign. To raise funds, we will leverage the "Hearing Wellness Expo" and solicit donations from Exhibitors and conduct an annual fund raising campaign. To secure Grants, we will submit Grant Requests.
Capabilities
HelpWhat are the organization’s capabilities for doing this? What resources, capacities, and connections support its progress towards long-term goals? Our capabilities are driven by our membership level, enthusiasm and ambition. We currently have adequate membership to achieve our goals and to advance the hearing loss cause through other programs. With our growing membership, we are able to continue to grow our membership and engage in more activities and community support.
Indicators
HelpHow will the organization know if it is making progress? What are the key qualitative and quantitative indicators against which the organization assesses its progress toward its intended impact? Indicators of success are membership growth, but more importantly, to maintain existing members. Members only stay with the Chapter if they feel we are dedicated, creative and successful with our programs. New programs that are envisioned by the members will contribute to success. Each program will have specific objectives and if these are met, they will become indicators of success.
Progress
HelpWhat has and hasn’t been accomplished so far? We have made great progress since our Chapter was created in April, 2012. We have fully or partially funded 11 loop installations. Our Chapter membership has grown ten-fold since the initial meetings. We outgrew our meeting location and moved to a new meeting facility in January, 2014,. We held our first "Hearing Wellness Expo" in May, 2014.  We now hold a "Hearing Wellness Expo" annually and our next one is March 3, 2018.
Programs
Description Collect new/used hearing aid and give them to qualified residents of our county. Collection is done via our website and a form is used for donors to enter mailing/receipt information.  This form is included with the donated hearing aid and mailed to our chapter.  Our chapter will then work with local Audiologists to have the devices tested and cleaned.  The hearing aids will then be offered to financially challenged residents at no charge.  The chapter also covers the cost of professional services (testing/fitting), ear molds, batteries and any needed Aural Rehabilitation. Hearing aids are offered to recipients who do not have Medicaid, VA insurance or any other insurance coverage that provides coverage for hearing aids.
Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled
General/Unspecified
Other Health/Disability
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.  Ten or more hearing aids and services to be given to residents at no cost. This is an on-going program and the chapter seeks continuous funding in order to attain long-term goal.  Our program is ramping up and we will seek $15,000 for each subsequent year.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.  All Polk County residents who need hearing aids will have one, either covered by insurance or by our chapter.   
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.   Spreadsheet reporting and our new Hearing Aid Network System. 
Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. We have given hearing aids to people in need and have a specific program which targets newborn-to-6 years of age. Our goal is to assure that babies born with hearing loss have an opportunity to learn communication skills in order to be competitive when they enter mainstream kindergarten.              
Description

The Hearing Loss Association of America, on behalf of people with hearing loss, and the American Academy of Audiology, on behalf of audiologists, announced a collaborative public education campaign, “Get in the Hearing Loop (http://www.hearingloss.org/content/get-hearing-loop) ” in June 2010.

“Get in the Hearing Loop” is a campaign to enlighten and excite hearing aid users, as well as audiologists and other professionals who dispense hearing aids, about telecoils and hearing loops and their unique benefits. Hearing loops transmit the audio from a PA system directly to telecoil- equipped hearing aids and cochlear implants. The telecoil functions as an antenna, relaying sounds directly into the ear without background noise just like Wi-Fi connects people to the Web.

Hearing aids can easily and affordably become wireless receivers for use with telephones and hearing assistive listening systems – hearing loops and neckloops – by adding a telecoil option to the aid. Sixty-nine percent of all hearing aids dispensed in the U.S. today have telecoils. Yet far too few consumers know about them and not enough hearing professionals recommend them.

The Hearing Loss Association of Lakeland, Florida, and the Central Florida Speech & Hearing Center have identified a common goal of Looping Lakeland, as part of the “Get in the Hearing Loop” program. “Get in the Hearing Loop” is our advocacy effort to get Hearing Loop Systems into local public venues (places of worship, playhouses, movie theatres, pharmacy checkouts, bank teller stations, store checkouts, and other locations where communication improvement will benefit those with a hearing loss.

The Hearing Loop System is the only system that sends clear, superior sound from a microphone directly into a hearing aid or cochlear implant without interference.

Population Served Other Health/Disability
Elderly and/or Disabled
General/Unspecified
Description

Captions are the written text of the spoken word. There are several situations where captioning is used.

TV: Most TV programs and commercials have closed captioning which means written words of the text are displayed on the TV screen. The captions are accessed either directly by the TV’s remote or going into the menu and finding the caption options. The Television Decoder Circuitry Act of 1990 mandates that since July 1993, all televisions manufactured for sale in the U.S. must contain a built-in caption decoder if the picture tube is 13 or larger. Closed captions on television programs most often have a black background and white text, although different combinations are possible.

Movies: Movies on DVD are captioned as TV shows are. Captions are turned on by turning on the captioning through the menu.

Movie theater captioning: some movie theaters offer open-captioned movies (where the word appears on the screen for everyone to see) or offer closed captioning through devices the customer must ask for. To see where captioned movies are playing in your area, go to www.captionfish.com(http://www.captionfish.com) .

Live theater captioning: some theaters offer captioned performances of live shows.

Captioned telephones show written captions of everything the caller says. The written text appears in a built-in display screen.

CART – Communication Access Real-Time Translation: the verbatim, near instantaneous conversion of spoken language into text. A stenotype machine, notebook computer and real-time software is used to produce the text. The text is usually displayed either on a screen by a projector connected to the notebook computer, or on a notebook computer or computer monitor.

CART is usually used by people with hearing loss who use spoken language as a primary mode of communication.

Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled
General/Unspecified
Other Health/Disability
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Collect an inventory of public venues, current capabilities, needed solutions, venue's plans and ability to fund, etc.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Public venues (community centers, theatres, playhouses, airports, etc.) will have captioning available to display spoken words intended to inform the public.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Comparison vs collection report
Description

This program is to cover the cost of SKI-HI certification for local teachers.

The SKI-HI program provides training that enables participants to work with deaf or hard of children from birth to 3 years of age. Currently, teachers who work with the disabled can only work with children over 3 years of age, which is very late for the child to learn communication skills. The goal is to have the child prepared to compete when entering mainstream kindergarten.
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5)
Other Health/Disability
Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Fund the training of two additional teachers in the SKI-HI program so they can work with children with hearing loss birth-to-6.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Newborns who are identified with hearing loss will always have access to hearing aids and professionals who can work with the families to make the best hearing/communication choices for the child.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Number of teachers completing SKI-HI training.
Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Our chapter has covered the cost of one teacher to complete the SKI-HI training program. Starting with the 2018 school year, the Polk County School System has assigned her to work with children with hearing loss and she can now work with birth-to-6 (it was 3-6 years old before the SKI-HI training).
Board Chair
Board Chair Ms. Elaine Goddard
Company Affiliation Retired
Term July 2014 to June 2018
Board Co-Chair
Board Co-Chair
Board
Board Members
NameCompany AffiliationsStatusCertificate*
Ms. Doris Beal RetiredVotingNo
Ms. Jackie Bowman RetiredVoting
Ms. Elaine Goddard RetiredVoting
Mr. Bert Goddard RetiredVoting
Ms. Kay Jay RetiredVoting
Mr. Art Matlock RetiredVoting
Ms. Norma Myers RetiredVoting
Mr. Ron Pushee RetiredVoting
*This individual has been awarded a Certificate in Orientation to Board Service by the Edyth Bush Institute for Philanthropy & Nonprofit Leadership at Rollins College ebi.rollins.edu, the Central Florida Partnership www.centralfloridapartnership.org, and the Central Florida Foundation www.cffound.org.
Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 0
Board Ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 6
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0
Policies
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict of Interest Policy No
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 0%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 0%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No
CEO/Executive Director
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Elaine Goddard
Term Start July 2014
Email egoddard7@gmail.com
CEO Salary Range N/A
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 8
Number of Contract Staff 0
Senior Staff
Title Treasurer
Experience/Biography
Title vice president
Experience/Biography
Title Secretary
Experience/Biography
Other
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Hearing Loss Association of America2012
State Registration No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Expiration Month Aug
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Expiration Year 2017
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start July 01, 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30, 2017
Documents
Form 990s
YearDocument
2016990 - 2016
2015990 - 2015
2014990 - 2014
IRS Letter of Determination
IRS LOD
Other Financial Documents
YearDocument
2014Revenue & Expenses 2014
2015Revenue & Expenses 2015
2016Revenue & Expenses 2016
Detailed Financials
Expense Allocations
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$4,936$5,694$13,345
Administration Expense$5,303$6,108$4,049
Fundraising Expense$0$0$0
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.961.310.80
Program Expense/Total Expenses48%48%77%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$0$0$0
Current Assets$0$0$0
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$0$0$0
Total Net Assets$0$0$0
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountSpecial events $9,221Special events $14,488Special events $9,683
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountMembership dues $325Individuals, foundations and corporations $505Foundations and corporations $3,356
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountOther $175Membership dues $436Membership dues $435
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities------
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets------
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
CEO Comments
Foundation Comments
Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster
Notes Programs listed here are those that are only activated during a disaster. Some organizations have unified budgeting and do not budget by program. Because of this, some budget fields may be blank or represent an approximation. Organization describes previous experience during the immediate response, recovery or rebuilding phases following a disaster.