Ability Housing, Inc.
76 South Laura Street
Suite 303
Jacksonville FL 32202
Contact Information
Address 76 South Laura Street
Suite 303
Jacksonville, FL 32202
Phone (904) 3599650
Fax (904) 3599653
Web and Social Media
Donate with a credit card http://www.abilityhousing.org
LinkedIn
Video
Mission
Mission
MISSION
The mission of Ability Housing is to build strong communities where everyone has a home.
 
Building: We build housing and transform sources of blight and disrepair into community assets.
Strong Communities: We strengthen communities by ensuring residents have wrap-around supports to help each achieve their potential.
 
Everyone: We help some of our most vulnerable neighbors - families and individuals who have a disability, are experiencing or at risk of homelessness - so they can grow as contributing members of our community.
 
Home: We provide quality housing because everyone should have a place to sleep, eat and raise their family.
VISION
A society where housing is a right, not a privilege, and all individuals have safe, affordable housing in vibrant communities.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Shannon Nazworth
Board Chair Greg Matovina
Board Chair Company Affiliation Matovina & Company
History
IRS Ruling Year 1992
Former Names
NameYear
Grove House of Jacksonville, Inc.2004
Abilily Housing of Northeast Florida, Inc.2016
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $1,873,007.00
Projected Expenses $2,480,069.00
Statements
Mission
MISSION
The mission of Ability Housing is to build strong communities where everyone has a home.
 
Building: We build housing and transform sources of blight and disrepair into community assets.
Strong Communities: We strengthen communities by ensuring residents have wrap-around supports to help each achieve their potential.
 
Everyone: We help some of our most vulnerable neighbors - families and individuals who have a disability, are experiencing or at risk of homelessness - so they can grow as contributing members of our community.
 
Home: We provide quality housing because everyone should have a place to sleep, eat and raise their family.
VISION
A society where housing is a right, not a privilege, and all individuals have safe, affordable housing in vibrant communities.
Impact

 Ability Housing’s accomplishments in 2015:

  • The Solution That Saves – Ability Housing secured the support of state agencies and began a statewide pilot to determine the Florida-specific cost benefits of providing permanent supportive housing to high utilizers of crisis services.
  • Village on Wiley – Ability Housing opened a new 43-unit project that provides high-quality permanent supportive housing for 43 chronically homeless individuals that were high-utilizers of crisis services.
  • Expanded the HousingLink Program 335%; helping 57 people who had been chronically homeless move into a home of their own
  • Expand to Central Florida – Because of our track record of success, in 2014 Ability Housing was asked to expand its service area to serve Orange, Osceola, and Seminole Counties. In 2015 we moved into our suite of offices in Central Florida graciously provided by Orlando, Inc.
  • Through a partnership with Orange County, Central Florida Foundation, Florida Hospital and The Wayne Densch Center we agreed to convert a transitional housing program into a high-quality 77-unit affordable and supportive housing community. Construction will begin in late 2016 or early 2017.
  • Through a partnership with the City of Orlando, we committed to transforming a boarded blight into a 166-unit high quality affordable and supportive housing community on Mercy Drive
  • Our goals for 2016:
  • Secure financing for an affordable supportive housing project in Central Florida. 
  • Open operations and increase engagement with the Central Florida community.
  • Continue to increase management capacity so as to effectively operate in both the Northeast and Central Florida communities.
  • Begin rehabilitation of the Wayne Densch Center
  • Begin pre-development of the Mercy Drive Project
  • Begin housing formerly homeless individuals in Central Florida

 

Independent Research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or program effectiveness? Yes
Needs

In order to expand its service area to serve the Central Florida community, Ability Housing needs three things from the Central Florida philanthropic sector:

  • Operating support – Ability Housing needs the support of the Central Florida community to expand its service area. In 2016 we need $458,569.00 in operating support for staff and operations  until we finish construction on our two projects in Central Florida and transition into our traditional funding model.
  • Program Related Investment – Ability Housing would like a PRI to fund the pre-development expenses necessary to close on the financing of an affordable and supportive housing project. This investment will be repaid when we close on the state administered permanent financing of the project and can be coupled with other investments
  • Advisory Board – Ability Housing would like to convene a Central Florida Advisory Board to support and facilitate its expansion into the community

 

Background

Ability Housing began as Grove House of Jacksonville, a group home serving six women with developmental disabilities.  Overwhelmed by requests for help, Grove House began providing community-based services; becoming one of the largest provider of services for adults with a disability in Northeast Florida.

One of the greatest challenges those we served faced was finding an affordable place to live; so Grove House began purchasing single-family homes and rented them to adults with a disability. We called this program CASA because each home was Convenient, Affordable, Safe and Accessible.

In 2004, it was decided to separate the services and housing programs into stand-alone nonprofits – and Ability Housing was born.

As a nonprofit dedicated solely to providing affordable rental housing to persons with a disability, we were approached by our local homeless coalition and its members and asked to expand our mission. In 2006, Ability Housing expanded its mission to serve persons experiencing homelessness, persons at risk of homelessness and adults with a disability.

With this mission expansion, Ability Housing started the Villages Program – affordable multi-family rental housing targeting individuals and families experiencing homelessness.

Recognizing we could never build enough housing to address the need, we later started the HousingLink Program – providing rental assistance linked with support services so that chronically homeless persons could access market housing.

Throughout this time, Ability Housing actively engaged in advocacy and policy work. Knowing no single agency could solve the problem, Ability Housing invested in advocating for local and state policies which would increase access to housing for our community’s most vulnerable neighbors. We also worked diligently to support other organizations, knowing that the more strong organizations there were to help those in the need, the greater the outcomes for the people we serve.

By 2014 Ability Housing had grown into a premiere provider of affordable and permanent supportive housing in Florida and was asked to serve the Central Florida community. We now serve Northeast and Central Florida; working in partnership with community organizations to develop lasting solutions so that adults with a disability have an independent place to live and none of our neighbors is without a home.

CEO Statement

Ability Housing is fortunate to have a staff and board that are dedicated to fulfilling our mission with passion and enthusiasm. Each is motivated by a deep respect for the persons we serve.

We are also driven by the desire to address the causes of homelessness and reasons why adults with a disability are relegated to living in overly-restrictive settings. Investing in solutions that address the causes of complex societal challenges is more impactful than limiting our efforts to managing the symptoms.

This is why Ability Housing actively engages in increasing the capacity of other organizations and systems of care. We take leadership roles in advocating for local and state policies which foster best practices and the efficient utilization of resources. To aid in achieving these outcomes our staff serve on multiple task forces, coalitions, policy advisory boards and councils.

We also focus heavily on our internal capacity. We are driven by data and the need to continuously improve our performance so as to better serve our residents and program participants. We monitor the performance of our properties and programs to ensure their long-term sustainability and impacts on the community. We also routinely monitor the outcomes of those we serve. This data is regularly assessed to ensure we are meeting our performance measures and are providing the best possible outcomes for our community, residents and program participants.

Board Chair Statement

At a strategic planning session for Ability Housing several years ago, I recall our executive director outlining the seemingly insurmountable issue that Northeast Florida faced with its homeless population; we had seen an increase of over 50% in just a few years. She challenged the Board to realize our goal should be to eliminate homelessness; not just help to manage it.

For the next 5-10 minutes, Board members seemed to focus on the size of the challenge, the difficulty of overcoming it and the cost to do so.

I remember suddenly being inspired to throw the challenge out to our young and inexperienced Board. “We just need to decide if we have the resolve to commit the time, expertise and resources to eradicate homelessness, not just get involved”.

To my surprise, one by one each of our Board members in one way or another expressed their resolve to take on the challenge.

It is now several years later and astounding progress has been made.

The homeless count in Northeast Florida has been reduced from approximately 3241 in 2010 to 1814 in 2015 as a result of the Ability Housing and other members of the Emergency Services and Homeless Coalition of Northeast Florida being focused on the problem.

The Housing First model has been adopted and embraced by the Coalition and its members, and more and more housing units are being set aside or built for the homeless. In addition, the Housing First model and its positive impacts on the people served as well as the community has become widely known and accepted in the broader community.

I am proud of the leadership role Ability Housing has played within the Northeast Florida community; thinking outside the box to find ways to transform our homeless management system into one which is focused on ending homelessness as quickly as possible. The staff and Board each took on added responsibilities as we worked with other stakeholders to create the systemic changes necessary to end homelessness in our community.

And now we are looking forward to engaging with the Central Florida community. It was truly an honor to be recognized for our good work; so recognized that we were asked to expand into Central Florida. This change will be another challenge for Ability Housing. We must engage with an entirely new group of stakeholders; identify a new set of strategic partners, and increase our capacity to encompass operations which are fully engaged in two tri-county regions of the state.

This is a challenge Ability Housing can handle. And we look forward to working alongside Central Florida partners as that community sets the goal of eliminating homelessness.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments We were not able to select specific Florida counties outside of Central Florida so we also selected "Florida" to reflect that we serve more than the Central Florida region.
NTEE Information
Primary Organization Type Housing, Shelter
Primary Organization SubType Low-Income & Subsidized Rental Housing
Secondary Organization Type Housing, Shelter
Secondary Organiztion SubType Independent Housing for People With Disabilities
Tertiary Organization Type Housing, Shelter
Tertiary Organization SubType Housing Support
Areas Served
Geographic Areas Served
FL - Orange
FL - Osceola
FL - Seminole
FL
Ability Housing serves Central and Northeast Florida.  The specific counties we serve are: 
  • Central Florida - Orange, Osceola, and Seminole
  • Northeast Florida - Clay, Duval, Nassau and St. Johns 
Goals
HelpWhat is the organization aiming to accomplish? This is the organization's ultimate goal for intended impact.

Ability Housing is founded upon the belief that all persons deserve a quality, affordable place to live; a home which fosters each person's quality of life, self-sufficiency, and independence.

We work to ensure that all persons with a disability have a quality place to live, in the least restrictive setting possible. We also work to ensure that no individual or family is homeless in our community.
 
In its strategic planning, Ability Housing made increasing community capacity to end homelessness a top priority for the organization. To achieve this, we established four priority objectives:
  • Ending chronic homelessness
  • Provide mission focused affordable housing for homeless and at-risk households
  • Support local policies which embrace best practice
  • Affect state systems to effectively and efficiently align housing w/ supports

Ability Housing’s core focus is to operate mission-focused housing which supports the dignity and increased the self-sufficiency of our residents. Recognizing we cannot build enough housing to meet the need, we also provide rental assistance so persons in need can access other community housing. All housing is linked with voluntary support services.

However, Ability Housing recognizes that it cannot achieve its strategic goal in isolation. To that end, we actively engage, support and take leadership roles in:
  • the development of local capacity to implement best practices;
  • engaging community leaders to increase the community’s capacity to end homelessness;
  • advocating for state policies and resource allocations that foster the development of supportive and affordable housing.
 
With its recent expansion into Central Florida, Ability Housing’s goal is to actively participate in similar efforts throughout the Central Florida region.
Ultimate success will be dependent upon effective and impactful policies at the state and federal level. Ability Housing works with community partners and statewide agencies to develop a comprehensive strategy to transform the homeless delivery system from one that manages homelessness into one that produces lasting solutions. This transformation entails four core components.
  • Housing – create additional units of housing and help households access existing affordable housing;
  • Support services – enable households to obtain and maintain housing by offering short-term and long-term support services;
  • Promote accountability and self-sufficiency – instill expectations of personal responsibility and self-reliance and help households become economically self-sufficient by increasing employability and providing assistance to obtain benefits;
  • Smart funding – public and private funders utilize the community's strategy when making funding decisions and create public and private dedicated revenue streams.

 

Strategies
HelpWhat are the organization's strategies for its stated long-term goals?

Ability Housing has six key strategies for accomplishing our long-term goals:

  1. Develop quality permanent supportive and affordable housing to serve persons with a disability as well as formerly homeless and at-risk persons.
  2. Provide rental assistance so that formerly homeless persons can access community housing.
  3. Ensure all residents and rental assistance recipients have access to quality support services to ensure they retain their housing and increase their self-sufficiency.
  4. Increase the capacity of the local Continuum of Care.
  5. Actively engage in state policy advocacy.
  6. Implement a statewide pilot to demonstrate the efficacy of providing permanent supportive housing.
 
Ability Housing implements strategy #1 by operating two housing programs: CASA and Villages (see Program section for more information).
 
Ability Housing implements strategy #2 through the HousingLink program (see Program section for more information).
 
Strategy #3 is implemented by ensuring that all residents and program participants have access to support services. Ability Housing contracts with not-for-profit and for-profit organizations to provide enrichment programs for the residents, such as training and workshops.
 
Each of these strategies increases Ability Housing’s internal capacity to achieve its goals. However, the capacity of the continuum and its interplay with state and federal resources and policies is also integral to successfully achieving our long-term goals.
Strategy #4 is implemented by taking an active role in the local Continuum of Care. In Northeast Florida, this entails participation in or chairing multiple advisory boards and/or committees. In addition, Ability Housing’s executive director co-chaired the CoC Planning Board during a period when tough decisions were made concerning community priorities, operational standards and potential reallocation of resources. In its expansion into Central Florida, Ability Housing will assess how best to support the local Continuum of Care in addressing the community’s capacity to implement best practices.
 
Strategy #5 is implemented by taking a leadership role in the Florida Supportive Housing Coalition (FSHC). FSHC is dedicated to increasing access to supportive housing throughout Florida. Through this collaborative effort, FSHC has successfully advocated for policy and resource allocation changes that have increased the supply of affordable housing for extremely low-income and special needs households. Ability Housing also actively engages with the Florida Council on Homelessness, the state’s inter-agency council responsible for advising the Governor and Legislature on how the state can better address homelessness.
 
Strategy #6 is implemented through the Solution That Saves pilot project, which will provide Florida-specific information that can be used by policy-makers to inform and to increase the statewide capacity to provide supportive housing.
Capabilities
HelpWhat are the organization’s capabilities for doing this? What resources, capacities, and connections support its progress towards long-term goals?

Ability Housing embraces a philosophy of collaboration, advocacy, and engagement to develop solutions for our community's most pressing problems: homelessness, poverty and the stigmatization of persons with disabilities.

The staff and board of Ability Housing are comprised of affordable housing professionals. Shannon Nazworth, Executive Director, has 20 years of experience in the development of affordable housing. She is experienced in all aspects of affordable housing development and financing including Low-Income Housing Tax Credits, HOME, CDBG, SHIP, SAIL, AHP, and NSP. Micheal Cochran, Operations Director, has over twelve years’ experience providing housing and/or services to homeless households with nine years’ experience in direct administration of HUD funded projects. Kimberlee Riley has over twenty years of experience working in leadership and business development roles in private, public and independent sectors. She is experienced in non-profit management, governance, and private-public partnerships.  

Leadership staff of Ability Housing is actively engaged in and connected to the community. Ability Housing staff serves on multiple boards, task forces, coalitions and advocacy groups targeted at developing and implementing systemic solutions at the local and state level.

The Executive Director chairs the State of Florida Council on Homelessness, advising the Florida Legislature and Governor on how to address homelessness in Florida; is board chair of the Florida Supportive Housing Coalition; was a member of the Jacksonville Community Council Mental Health Inquiry Management Team; and serves on the National Low Income Housing Coalition Policy Committee. Each year the Executive Director leads Tallahassee-based advocacy and education efforts concerning the housing needs of vulnerable populations and co-hosts a state conference on homelessness and supportive housing.

The Operations Director serves on the Emergency Services and Homeless Coalition Coordinated Intake Board, Nassau Affordable Housing Task Force, and ESHC Data Quality Committee.

The Property Development Director serves on the Associated Builders and Contractors State Board; chairs the Associated Builders and Contractors First Coast Chapter Government Affairs Committee; and is past president of the Associated Builders and Contractors Women’s Council.
The Central Florida Regional Director serves on the Continuum of Care HMIS Advisory Board, UCF Lifelong Learning in Education Advisory Board and is an active participant in Covenant House's Annual Executive SleepOut to end youth homelessness. 

Since 2009 the Executive Director and staff have partnered with FSHC, Florida Alcohol and Drug Abuse Association, Florida Partners In Crisis, Disability Rights Florida and the Florida Council on Community Mental Health to successfully educate and advocate on behalf of the housing and support service needs of various special needs populations throughout Florida.

In response to several years of advocacy, in 2014 Ability Housing was awarded funding to implement a pilot to assess the cost benefits and improved outcomes associated with providing permanent supportive housing to high utilizers of crisis services. The data derived from this pilot will be used to develop high-impact state policy and funding strategies.

Indicators
HelpHow will the organization know if it is making progress? What are the key qualitative and quantitative indicators against which the organization assesses its progress toward its intended impact?

Ability Housing ends homelessness for families in crisis; improves residents' self-sufficiency and independent living skills, and provides cost savings and improved outcomes for publicly funded systems.

Ability Housing’s Villages Program consists of 238 units of permanent housing for homeless and at-risk persons with an additional 77 units in development and a 166-unit project in pre-development. The Villages Program is comprised of the following properties:

  • Mayfair Village Apartments is an 83-unit apartment community with 42 units targeted to households earning 30% or less of the Area Median Income (AMI); 41 units are targeted to households earning 50% or less of the AMI, and 42 units are reserved for homeless households.
  • Renaissance Village Apartments is a 52-unit apartment community. All units are targeted to homeless and at-risk households earning 35% or less of AMI.
  • Oakland Terrace Apartments is a 60-unit, Section 8 HUD-assisted property. All units are targeted to households earning 60% or less of AMI; 12 units are reserved for families experiencing homelessness with incomes of 30% AMI or less.
  • Village on Wiley is a 43-unit permanent supportive housing project. All units are reserved for high utilizers of crisis services.
HousingLink is a scattered site permanent supportive program whereby Ability Housing provides rental assistance and support services to 55 formerly chronically homeless households so that they may afford market apartments.
 
The CASA Program provides quality, affordable, housing for adults with a developmental and/or cognitive disability. Through CASA, Ability Housing has built and/or purchased 29 single-family homes scattered throughout the community. The program currently serves 56 residents. All residents are Low-Income; over 65% are Extremely Low-Income.
 
Ability Housing has two measures of success: the number of people housed and the outcome of those persons. Monthly reports track the number of people housed, participation in group activities, financial education instruction, service contacts per month, and enrollments into employment training. A semi-annual report provides program outcomes related to stable housing, changes in income, and changes in benefit and health coverage enrollment.
 
Our CASA program consistently has a housing stability rate of over 95% while the properties in our Villages program have housing stability rates between 86% and 95.5%. In the first full year (2014) of the HousingLink program, the housing stability rate was 87%. Another measure of success tracked by Ability Housing is annual household income change. For 2014 the annual household income change for Villages program households was 4%.
Progress
HelpWhat has and hasn’t been accomplished so far?

Ability Housing’s efforts are most evident in the reduction of persons experiencing homelessness. Ability Housing has produced 238 units of housing for homeless families and has an additional 77 in development. In addition, Ability Housing has developed 118 units of housing serving very low-income households and/or persons with a disability. Overall, Ability Housing served 483 adults and 344 children in 2015.

Ability Housing’s accomplishments toward its long-term goals include: 

  • adding a new Villages property every 18 months since 2011;
  • creating a new program, HousingLink, specifically targeted to assist persons who are chronically homeless;
  • successfully advocating that the state fund a housing development and convene multiple state agencies to participate in the “Solution That Saves”;
  • successfully advocating the redirection of state housing resources to serve more Extremely Low Income and Special Needs Households; and
  • working closely with the Northeast Florida Continuum of Care members to establish a coordinated intake system for all housing units dedicated to persons experiencing homelessness.

 

Despite Ability Housing’s record of success, the agency faces two significant barriers.  The first relates to accessing government resources: 

  • Federal resources dedicated to the production of housing affordable to homeless households is very limited and diminishing.  One of the biggest barriers Ability Housing faces is accessing these highly-over-subscribed financing sources.  Ability Housing must develop the capacity to more actively engaged in federal affordable housing and homeless advocacy efforts.  
  • Despite successful state advocacy efforts, there is still much needed to be done to increase the supply of supportive and affordable housing.  State legislators routinely redirect affordable housing resources to other purposes.  And dedicated funding for services within supportive housing is very limited and not linked with the housing production.  State agencies do not align resources and initiatives to facilitate the production of supportive housing.
  • Locally administered resources such as HOME, CDBG, HOPWA, NSP, SHIP and ESG must be better aligned to producing permanent supportive housing.
 
The second relates to community capacity.  The community, including but not limited to the Continuum of Care, must align efforts and resources to increase the overall capacity of providers to collaborate to serve homeless persons.
 
 
One of the greatest barriers is the community's capacity to provide high-quality support services to our residents and program participants.  Ability Housing routinely has difficulty identifying service provider partners that provide the level of service necessary for residents to be successful.  Ability Housing continues to work with area providers to identify strategies to address capacity issues. 
Programs
Description

The Villages Program consists of four quality, multi-family rental properties with an additional two properties in development. The properties are targeted to serving formerly homeless individuals and families.  Some had been homeless for only a short period of time. Others had spent years, even decades, on the street and are provided permanent supportive housing.

 
We pride ourselves on being good neighbors. Each neighborhood in which we have developed a property has asked us to do more. We utilize sound property management practices, making sure the properties are well maintained and provide a quality living environment for all residents.
 
Each of the Villages Program properties is dedicated to fostering the dignity, increased independence, and self-sufficiency of all of our residents. Individualized support services are offered to all residents so that they may maintain their housing and access community-based services.

We also partner with area organizations to offer training and workshops to enhance the residents’ housing.

Population Served Homeless
People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

50% of households experiencing housing instability will participate in voluntary case management support services

25% of non-disabled unemployed or under-employed adults will participate in workforce development program

80% of disabled adults eligible for, but not receiving Medicaid will receive support services to help them apply for Medicaid

35% will participate in resident-enrichment activities such as training, workshops, and individualized financial counseling

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

85% of resident households will retain stable housing; whether by remaining as a resident at one of the Villages program properties or by exiting and securing other stable housing within the community

 
30% of non-disabled adults will increase earned income
 
80% of disabled adults currently not receiving benefits will obtain benefits to which they are entitled
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Program outcomes are monitored in two ways – the operations of the multi-family rental properties and the outcomes of the residents residing at the properties.

Property operations are monitored by the Operations Administrator. Third-party property managers submit monthly reports documenting the status of each property. These are reviewed to determine the: 

  • occupancy level – how many units are occupied
  • economic occupancy level – how much of the rent due is being collected
  • budget variance – how is the property operating as compared to projections
  • cash flow – how is the property managing its financial resources

 In addition, staff routinely visits each property to assess the physical condition and overall operation of the property. This is done to ensure the condition of the property meets our standards and remains “a good neighbor” to the community in which it is located.

Resident outcomes are monitored by the Operations Director utilizing Homeless Management Information System data, monthly reports from contracted case management providers and information contained within the property management reports.

Resident satisfaction is monitored via voluntary annual surveys.

Property operations and resident outcomes are monitored by the Quality Control Committee, chaired by a member of the board of directors.

Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

In 2015:

95.5% of residents maintained housing stability



As one Ability Housing resident stated about her family's housing, "Ability Housing has really helped me because, at the time, I felt like I’d lost everything.  I’d lost my business, my home, and my little girl.  I know there are no magic formulas that make everything instantly come together, but I can say that I know unequivocally Ability Housing has given me the leg up I needed to get my life on track.  This home is a home."

Description

CASA is Ability Housing’s first project. It is a scattered-site single-family rental project consisting of 29 homes scattered throughout the community. CASA provides quality, affordable housing for adults with a disability; it is called CASA because each home is Convenient, Affordable, Safe and Accessible.

CASA was designed for adults with a developmental disability that wish to live independently in the community; but do not want to live alone. Each house is rented to two or three roommates. Residents have their own supports and are responsible for selecting their roommates.

Rents are affordable, varying based upon each tenant’s ability to pay. CASA is so innovative it was designated a State Demonstration Project by the Florida Developmental Disabilities Council. Further, according to annual surveys of our residents, 100% of respondents rate their housing as good or excellent.

Population Served People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities
People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Homeless
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

90% of residents will maintain stable housing

90% of residents will rate their housing as good or excellent on annual surveys

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

90% of residents will maintain stable housing

 
90% of residents will rate their housing as good or excellent on annual surveys

Due to confidentiality requirements, Ability Housing does not access data concerning individual resident outcomes. As such, resident outcome targets beyond housing stability and satisfaction with their housing are not established.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Property operations are monitored by the Operations Administrator. Third-party property managers submit monthly reports documenting the status each property. These are reviewed to determine the:

  • occupancy level – how many units are occupied
  • economic occupancy level – how much of the rent due is being collected
  • budget variance – how is the property operating as compared to projections
  • cash flow – how is the property managing its financial resources

In addition, staff routinely visits each property to assess the physical condition and overall operation of the property. This is done to ensure the condition of the properties meets our standards and each house remains an asset to the neighborhood in which it is located.

Resident satisfaction is monitored via voluntary annual surveys.

Property operations and resident outcomes are monitored by the Quality Control Committee, chaired by a member of the board of directors.

Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
The success of the CASA program is best demonstrated by the impact it has on its residents.  
 
"Your organization has made a huge difference in my daughter’s life. I was so worried she was going to be cheated out of a normal life. In three months’ time she has become an independent adult enjoying herself and experiencing new things on a daily basis."
 
And this quote from the sister of a long-time CASA resident, "I never would have dreamed when my brother and I were growing up that he would have the opportunity to live in a house of his own. I always expected that he would either live with family or in a group home. Although he has lived in both these situations before, living in his own home has been much better for him...Having his own home has been the best place for him. He enjoys living with just his wife as any other grown man would do. Thank you for continuing to provide housing and subsidies for those with disabilities."
 
 
Description

HousingLink is a scattered-site permanent supportive housing program which enables persons with a disability who have experienced long-term or repetitive homelessness to access housing within the community.

Funded by several homeless assistance grants from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, HousingLink provides residents with rental assistance so that they can afford housing provided by others in the community. Ability Housing then partners with area service providers to ensure that residents have access to the supports they need to retain their housing and increase their self-sufficiency. All supports are voluntary.

With HousingLink, Ability Housing is able to expand the housing options it can offer to the community’s chronically homeless neighbors and help more people exit homelessness – forever.

Population Served Homeless
People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

90% of households experiencing housing instability will participate in voluntary case management support services

80% of disabled adults eligible for, but not receiving Medicaid will be enrolled in Medicaid within 12 months of intake


Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

85% of resident households will retain stable housing; whether by remaining in the program or by exiting and securing other stable housing within the community

80% of disabled adults currently not receiving benefits will obtain benefits to which they are entitled

95% of participants not enrolled in healthcare services at intake will be enrolled within 6 months

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Participant outcomes are monitored by the Operations Director utilizing Homeless Management Information System data and monthly reports from contracted case management providers.

Program outcomes are monitored by the Quality Control Committee, chaired by a member of the board of directors.

Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. The HousingLink program is a new program; as such it does not have a long history of program implementation.  However in its first full year of operation (2014) it achieved a housing stability rate of 87%; higher than the national standard for chronically homeless individuals.
Comments
CEO Comments The Villages and CASA budgets do not include the expenses for operating the properties.  Those expenses are funded through property rental income.  
Board Chair
Board Chair Greg Matovina
Company Affiliation Matovina & Company
Term Jan 2013 to Dec 2016
Board Co-Chair
Board Co-Chair Ross McWilliams
Company Affiliation Fidelity Bank
Term Start Jan 2016 Jan 2019
Board
Board Members
NameCompany AffiliationsStatusCertificate*
Bob C. Hart Retired Business ExecutiveVotingNo
Valerie H. Jenkins Wells Fargo, Senior Community Development Officer for the Northern and Central Regions of FloridaVoting
Renee Jenkins Bank of AmericaVoting
Chip Keller Thames Markey & Heekin, P.A.Voting
Gregory Matovina Matovina & Company, PresidentVoting
Davis McCarty Retired Business ExecutiveVoting
Ross McWilliams Fidelity BankVoting
Doug Orange Sulzbacher Center, HOPE Team Outreach SpecialistVoting
Ruth Owen Everbank, Senior Vice PresidentVotingNo
Jake Peek Driver, McAfee, Peek & Hawthorne, PartnerVoting
James W Pellott Retired Business ExecutiveVoting
Dan Scheuble Voting
Lisa Shepherd Shepherd Consulting, LLCVotingNo
*This individual has been awarded a Certificate in Orientation to Board Service by the Edyth Bush Institute for Philanthropy & Nonprofit Leadership at Rollins College ebi.rollins.edu, the Central Florida Partnership www.centralfloridapartnership.org, and the Central Florida Foundation www.cffound.org.
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 12
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0
Other (if specified) 0
Policies
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Standing Committees
Standing Committees
Committee Name
Audit
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Executive
Board Governance
Housing and Community Development
CEO/Executive Director
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Shannon Nazworth
Term Start Nov 2003
Email snazworth@abilityhousing.org
Experience

Mrs. Nazworth joined Ability Housing in 1993, as the agency evolved into an organization dedicated solely to the development and operation of quality, independent housing for adults with disabilities. She has twenty years’ experience in the development of affordable housing. She is the former Associate Director of Habitat for Humanity of the Jacksonville Beaches, Inc.; Regional Administrator for Habitat for Humanity International; and Chief Financial Officer of Habitat for Humanity of Jacksonville, Inc.

Mrs. Nazworth is actively involved in statewide advocacy efforts. She chairs Florida’s Council on Homelessness; is President of the Florida Supportive Housing Coalition; serves as Board Secretary for the Florida Community Loan Fund; serves as a member of the Chase Community Advisory Board and is a past gubernatorial appointee to the Affordable Housing Study Commission. Mrs. Nazworth routinely participates in rule development for various state affordable housing programs; chaired a statewide workgroup which developed ‘Common Sense: A Strategic Plan to Provide Supportive Housing Throughout Florida’; was awarded Advocate of the Year by the Southeast Institute on Homelessness and Supportive Housing and 2014 Eastern Region Advocate of the Year by the Corporation of Supportive Housing; and was a member of the Leadership Jacksonville class of 2011.

 
Mrs. Nazworth is a graduate of Boston College; received a certificate in Executive Leadership from the Harvard Business School, and has a Certificate in Nonprofit Management from Duke University.
CEO Salary Range $125,001 - $150,000
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 9
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 10
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 83%
Senior Staff
Title Operations Director
Experience/Biography

Micheal Cochran, Operations Director – has personally experienced homelessness and has over fourteen years’ experience providing housing and/or services to homeless individuals and families. He has over eight years’ experience in direct administration of HUD funded projects. He currently supervises all support services for Ability Housing properties and has administrative responsibilities for four HUD funded permanent supportive housing projects for chronically homeless households and a HOPWA funded Special Project of National Significance Housing project for women with children. His community service accomplishments include serving as a member of the Jacksonville HIV Health Services Planning Council, as a Board member of the Florida Homeless Coalition and as a Board member of the Jacksonville Emergency Services and Homeless Coalition. Micheal has a Bachelor of Health Science and a Master of Public Health from the University of North Florida. He has also completed the Health Care Executive Program at UCLA’s Graduate School of Management.


 

Title Property Development Manager
Experience/Biography

As Property Development Manager, Michelle brings over 25 years of construction experience to Ability Housing. She is responsible for site identification of future projects, project development including design and construction and project management. She has a strong focus on sustainability and has worked as a project manager, risk manager and general manager for Florida-based contracting firms. She received numerous project awards and has also received national recognition for outstanding safety and training programs she developed and implemented for several companies.


Her credentials include LEED® AP, OSHA Authorized Trainer and NCCER Master Trainer. Michelle is involved in the community; she is the current Chair of the City of Jacksonville’s Environmental Protection Board and serves on a variety of boards including the ACE Mentor Program, Jacksonville Youthworks and the Springfield Preservation and Revitalization Council. Over the past 30 years she has worked with civic and business organizations to support Florida’s entrepreneurs and citizens working with state and local government to grow small businesses, strengthen our communities and improve our neighborhoods.

Title Regional Director, Central Florida
Experience/Biography
As Regional Director, Kimberlee brings more than 25 years of experience in private, public, and independent sectors and has led organizational growth in each sector.  Her skills and expertise include strategies for business development, strategic planning, public/private partnerships, education, governance, organizational culture, communications, and sustainable revenue programs.  Kimberlee helped grow Busch Entertainment Corporation/Sea World revenue programs through concession operations and supported Jefferson National Parks Association's growth in services to ten public land sites in six states as well as diversify their revenue strategies.  In her former role with Orange County, she was the liaison with Orange County Comptroller's Office, Risk Management, Office of Professional Standards, and Human Resources ensuring compliance as well as best practices.  

Kimberlee is responsible for leading Ability Housing's expansion into the Central Florida community through effective engagement and strategic partnerships with systems of care, local governments, and civic leaders.  This role includes developing a regional team and advisory board.
 
Kimberlee graduated from Auburn University with a BA in International Trade and Economics and is a member of Leadership Orlando class 91. She has consulted and trained internationally on private/public partnerships and organizational growth as well as served on national association boards and task forces with the Department of Interior. Kimberlee serves on local Central Florida boards supporting various non-profit organizations.   
Title Strategy and Development Director
Experience/Biography

Martha Cox is the Strategy and Development Director for Ability Housing. She will lead the implementation of the Board approved Strategic Plan to fulfill the mission of building strong communities where everyone has a home. In addition, she will be responsible for leading the fundraising and development efforts to ensure that Ability Housing has the needed dollars so that the most vulnerable members of our community live in safe, decent and stable housing and are able to become contributing members of our society. Martha has spent over 20 years in the private sector, most notably as a Senior Manager at SBC/Pacific Bell as well as over 10 years in the nonprofit sector in Jacksonville. She is a Certified Fund Raising Executive, graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Science from California State University at Long Beach and was awarded her Masters of Business Administration as a Dean’s Scholar from University of California, Irvine. Martha lives with her husband and college age son in Murray Hill.

Plans
Organization has Fundraising Plan? No
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Date Strategic Plan Adopted Sept 2011
Management Succession Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Other
Collaborations

Ability Housing has a long track record of collaborating with other organizations.

In Central Florida, we are partnering with the Central Florida Commission on Homelessness to implement its regional strategy to reduce homelessness through the community.

Ability Housing is partnering with Orange Blossom Family Health to develop the capacity to operate permanent supportive housing (PSH).

In addition, we will partner with the Homeless Services Network in its efforts to implement best practices in Central Florida.

In Northeast Florida, Ability Housing partners with River Region Human Services on 4 PSH projects, as well as with Family Foundations in its nationally recognized “1,000 in 1,000” initiative.

The Solution That Saves, a state pilot to determine the cost savings of providing PSH to high utilizers of crisis services, will be done in partnership with Lutheran Services Florida, Jacksonville University, Emergency Services and Homeless Coalition, area hospitals, and the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office.

We also work closely with the following organizations to affect statewide systems change: Disability Rights Florida, Florida Alcohol and Drug Abuse Association, Florida Coalition for the Homeless, Florida Council on Community Mental Health, and Florida Supportive Housing Coalition.

Awards
AwardAwarding OrganizationYear
Fair/Accessible Housing AwardJacksonville Human Rights Commission2009
Fair/Accessible Housing AwardJacksonville Human Rights Commission2013
Special Needs Housing AssistanceFlorida Housing Coalition2013
CEO Comments Ability Housing is fortunate to have a staff and board that are dedicated to fulfilling our mission with passion and enthusiasm. Each is motivated by a deep respect for the persons we serve. We are also driven by the desire to address the causes of homelessness and reasons why adults with a disability are relegated to living in overly-restrictive settings. Investing in solutions that address the causes of complex societal challenges is more impactful than limiting our efforts to managing the symptoms. This is why Ability Housing actively engages in increasing the capacity of other organizations and systems of care. We take leadership roles in advocating for local and state policies which foster best practices and the efficient utilization of resources. To aid in achieving these outcomes our staff serve on multiple task forces, coalitions, policy advisory boards and councils. We also focus heavily on our internal capacity. We are driven by data and the need to continuously improve our performance so as to better serve our residents and program participants. We monitor the performance of our properties and programs to ensure their long-term sustainability and impacts on the community. We also routinely monitor the outcomes of those we serve. This data is regularly assessed to ensure we are meeting our performance measures and are providing the best possible outcomes for our community, residents and program participants.
State Registration Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Expiration Month July
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Expiration Year 2015
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01, 2016
Fiscal Year End Dec 31, 2016
Documents
Form 990s
YearDocument
2015990
2015Signed 990
2014990
2013990
2012990
2011990
2010Form 990
2009Form 990
2008Form 990
IRS Letter of Determination
IRS Determination Letter
Detailed Financials
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$0$0$0
Government Contributions$1,097,414$548,392$531,386
Federal$0$0$0
State$0$0$0
Local$0$0$0
Unspecified$1,097,414$548,392$531,386
Individual Contributions$883,753$370,474$82,367
$0$0$0
$1,557,388$1,451,197$2,339,395
Investment Income, Net of Losses$56,378$131,349$108,293
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$0$0$0
Revenue In-Kind$0$195,866$0
Other$0$0$0
Expense Allocations
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$2,781,667$744,099$1,388,063
Administration Expense$134,254$115,259$86,891
Fundraising Expense$70,929$60,832$23,934
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.201.402.04
Program Expense/Total Expenses93%39%93%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue4%7%4%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$19,992,044$14,465,894$13,381,192
Current Assets$5,081,588$3,799,495$3,228,951
Long-Term Liabilities$14,133,159$9,425,389$9,305,533
Current Liabilities$270,623$60,326$31,818
Total Net Assets$5,588,262$4,980,179$4,043,841
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountEarned Revenue $1,557,388Earned Revenue $1,451,197Earned Revenue $2,339,395
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountGovernment $1,097,414Government unspecified $548,392Government $531,386
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountFoundations, Corporations and Individuals $883,753Individuals $370,474Investment Income $108,293
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities18.7862.98101.48
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets71%65%70%
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign PurposeHelpCapital Campaigns are defined as a fundraising efforts over-and-above an organization's annual operating budget. Campaigns might include the purchase of land or a building, major renovations, and major equipment purchases. Endowment campaigns may also be included if the funds are legally restricted. Pre-development expenses for the Mercy Drive Project 166-Unit of new affordable housing with supportive services to house formerly homeless individuals and families. Rehabilitation of the Wayne Densch Center from transitional housing to 77 units of affordable supportive housing.
Campaign Goal 9450000
Capital Campaign Dates June 2016 - Dec 2017
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date $4,800,000.00 as of July 2016
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
CEO Comments
2014 Due to the nature of the financing utilized for some of our multi-family rental project developments (Low-Income Housing Tax Credit equity), the Ability Housing audited financial statements are consolidated with two LLCs in which Ability Housing is only a 0.01% owner.  The losses reflected in those statements relate to the depreciation of the real property; the losses associated with the real estate are one of the benefits provided to the equity investor.
 
The Form 990 is not consolidated and represents solely the activity of Ability Housing and the properties it owns independently. 
Foundation Comments
Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster
Notes Programs listed here are those that are only activated during a disaster. Some organizations have unified budgeting and do not budget by program. Because of this, some budget fields may be blank or represent an approximation. Organization describes previous experience during the immediate response, recovery or rebuilding phases following a disaster.

Related Information

Homelessness

A newly released report entitled "The Cost of Long-Term Homelessness in Central Florida" reveals the economic impact of the issue. Among the findings: -Central Florida (Orange, Osceola & Seminole counties) has the highest chronic homeless population in the nation for a region our size. -There are at least 1,577 chronic or long-term homeless individuals on Central Florida's streets (averaged over five years). -The average annual cost per chronic or long-term homeless individual to remain on the streets is $31,065 (taking into account arrests, incarceration, and hospitalizations only and excluding shelter nights, mental health, probation or parole costs, emergency transport costs, or loss of business enterprise).