Mothers' Milk Bank of Florida, Inc.
8669 Commodity Circle Suite 490
Orlando FL 32819
Contact Information
Address 8669 Commodity Circle Suite 490
Orlando, FL 32819
Phone (407) 248 5050
Fax (407) 370-4340
Web and Social Media
Donate with a credit card http://www.milkbankofflorida.org/mothers/
Instagram
Pinterest
Video


Mission
Mission

The mission of the Mothers’ Milk Bank of Florida (MMBFL) is to improve population health and promote healing by collecting, processing and distributing pasteurized donor human milk to vulnerable babies when milk from the baby’s own mother isn’t available.

Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Kandis Natoli PhD, RNC, IBCLC
Board Chair Mrs. Layne Petrino ARNP, NNP-BC, CLC
Board Chair Company Affiliation Nemours Childrens' Hospital
History
IRS Ruling Year 2012
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expense Bar Graph
 
 
Projected Revenue $350,000.00
Projected Expenses $412,000.00
Statements
Mission

The mission of the Mothers’ Milk Bank of Florida (MMBFL) is to improve population health and promote healing by collecting, processing and distributing pasteurized donor human milk to vulnerable babies when milk from the baby’s own mother isn’t available.

Impact

Breastfeeding is the natural biological mode of infant feeding, and breast milk is superior to any artificially prepared substitute (AAP: Eidelman, 2012; CPS: Kim, 2010; WHO, 2008). However, not all mothers are able to supply breastmilk and  pasteurized donor human milk (PDHM) is the next best nutritional option. Among these medically fragile newborns, there is a higher risk for complications, comorbidities, and death when human milk is not available. (Abrams, 2014;  Cristofalo, 2013; Quigley, 2014; Herrman, 2014). The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the use of PDHM when milk from the baby’s mother is not available. The US Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding specifically addresses the need to provide banked human milk to vulnerable infants.

 

The number of live births in Florida during 2014 was 219,905, and of these, 3,550 were very low birth weight (VLBW) (Florida Charts). Approximately 12% of VLBW infants will suffer from NEC and about 1/3 of these will have life-long complications such as nutrition-associated liver disease and short bowel syndrome. About 1/3 of babies who develop NEC will die. NEC accounts for 19% of neonatal expenditures; about $100,000 per case or more than $5 billion annually. Human milk decreases an infant’s risk of NEC 80% compared to formula. The use of human milk also reduces the length of the hospital stay and decreases the risk of sepsis (Gephart, 2012). The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends human milk as the only appropriate food for VLBW babies.

 

Though pasteurized donor human milk is available from other states, that milk lacks the immunities needed to defend infants from many harmful microorganisms endemic to Florida. Further, it is more costly to import banked milk from other states. Locally supplied and prepared donor human milk is needed for Florida’s 67 neonatal intensive care units.

Independent Research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or program effectiveness? Yes
Needs

MMBFL’s ability to meet the needs of the 67 or more Level II and higher NICUs in Florida is impeded by a shortage of equipment and personnel. 



Background

Mothers’ Milk Bank of Florida is the community milk bank of Florida. The mission is to improve health and promote healing by collecting, processing, and distributing pasteurized donor human milk to vulnerable babies, when milk from the baby’s own mother is not available. The staff and volunteers of Mothers’ Milk Bank of Florida (MMBFL) work toward the goal of ensuring the availability of safe, pasteurized donor human milk for all of Florida’s vulnerable infants.

 

In 2011, health care professionals joined with other community members to begin the fundraising and training needed to open a milk bank in Florida that would meet the standards of the Human Milk Banking Association of North America (HMBANA). In addition to individual gifts, MMBFL has received funds of over $200,000 from large organizations, including Edyth Bush Charitable Foundation, Arnold Palmer Medical Center Foundation, Pediatrix Medical Group, and Florida Hospital Community Impact Council. MMBFL received financial support and rental space from OneBlood of Central Florida, valued at $176,000. MMBFL opened in June 2015, with completion of laboratory facilities, the purchase and installation of milk storage and processing equipment, acquisition of office space and equipment, and the hiring of a skeleton staff. MMBFL was accredited by the Human Milk Banking Association of North America (HMBANA) and accreditation was reaffirmed in June 2016.
 

The Executive Director is a PhD prepared nurse scientist with many years of experience in maternal-child health. The staff includes an Office Manager with extensive business and accounting experience, as well as a Program Director, Community Outreach Coordinator, and Volunteer Coordinator. Several other staff members are diligently working toward meeting HMBANA’s criteria as milk technicians. The members of the Board of Directors have a passionate commitment to the mission and include representatives from business, healthcare, and social service sectors.

There is an ample pool of donor moms, an experienced staff and Board of Directors, and established distributions channels with healthcare facilities. MMBFL has a solid foundation to build upon as it strives to meet Florida’s need for pasteurized donor human milk.

CEO Statement
Board Chair Statement
As a Neonatal Nurse Practitioner working with preterm and sick babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), I see directly the critical role that breast milk plays in the health and outcomes for medically fragile babies. I have the honor of being the Chair of the Board of Directors for an amazing organization, working along with many passionate, diverse, and dedicated Board Members to achieve our mission of providing safe donor human milk to babies in need, when maternal breast milk is not available. We also strive to increase public awareness of donor human milk banking and how donor human milk saves lives.
 
After successfully establishing the first donor human milk bank in Florida in June of 2015 the mission of the milk bank has continued to be to provide safe, pasteurized donor human milk to the premature and at risk infants across the state of Florida. With a milk bank in Florida, we can help maintain an adequate supply of donor milk for our babies, both in the hospital and at home. In recent months Mothers’ Milk Bank of Florida has also established a mechanism to provide charity care in the form reduced-cost or no cost donor human milk for patients who would medically benefit from breast milk but whose insurances do not cover the milk and who cannot afford to purchase the milk out of pocket. One precious drop at a time, we can save the lives of babies now and improve their quality of life for years to come.
 
Layne Petrino, NNP, ARNP-BC, CLC
Board Chair 2015-Present 
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Extensive research, including a systematic review conducted by the Cochrane Foundation, has demonstrated the efficacy of the use of pasteurized donor human milk, especially for neonatal intensive care patients. The current bioethics conversation regarding the commodification of human milk by for-profit corporations has raised the issue of exploitation and coercion of poor women and could be considered a violation of equity, justice, and human dignity.

MMBFL is a non-profit institution that collects milk from donor women who receive no compensation for their milk. We adhere to the guidelines of the Human Milk Banking of North America.

Dias, M. (2015). The commodification of breast milk: Recent Issues, ethical concerns and a call for regulation. Voices in BioEthics.

http://voicesinbioethics.org/2015/03/31/the-commodification-of-breast-milk-recent-issues-ethical-concerns-and-a-call-for-regulation/


NTEE Information
Primary Organization Type Food, Agriculture & Nutrition
Primary Organization SubType Single Organization Support
Secondary Organization Type Health Care
Secondary Organiztion SubType Health Support
Tertiary Organization Type Public & Societal Benefit
Tertiary Organization SubType Public & Societal Benefit NEC
Areas Served
Geographic Areas Served
FL
FL - Brevard
FL - Lake
FL - Marion
FL - Orange
FL - Osceola
FL - Polk
FL - Seminole
FL - Sumter
FL - Volusia
FL - Winter Park

The Mothers’ Milk Bank of Florida serves NICU patients throughout the state of Florida and can help meet the demand for pasteurized donor human milk in other states in the Southeastern United States.  Hospitals in Central Florida who have received milk from MMBFL or send donor milk through their depot include: Winter Park Memorial Hospital, Florida Hospital for Children, Winnie Palmer Hospital, and Nemours Children's Hospital. 

Goals
HelpWhat is the organization aiming to accomplish? This is the organization's ultimate goal for intended impact.

The Mothers’ Milk Bank of Florida urgently needs to expand production capabilities to pasteurize tens of thousands of ounces of raw donor milk Floridian women have sent to the bank to meet the needs of Florida’s children. While breastfeeding is the natural biological mode of infant feeding, not all mothers are able to supply breast milk for their medically fragile infants. Safe, pasteurized donor human milk is the next best nutritional option. Among these vulnerable infants, there is a higher risk for complications, comorbidities, and death when human milk is not available. (Abrams, et. al, 2014; Cristofalo, et. al, 2013; Quigley & McGuire, 2014; Sullivan, et, al, 2010). The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the use of pasteurized donor human milk when milk from the baby’s mother is not available. Pasteurized donor human milk is available through an accredited group of nonprofit milk banks and through for profit processors. The US Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding recommended the development of more nonprofit milk banks.


Florida’s birth rate of 11.2 births per 1,000 population and the infant mortality rate of 6.0 per 1,000 are similar to the US averages. The number of live births in Florida during 2014 was 219,905, and of these, 3,550 were very low birth weight (VLBW) (Florida Charts). Approximately 12% of VLBW infants will suffer from necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a serious disease of the digestive track. About 1/3 of these infants will have life-long complications such as liver disease and short bowel syndrome and about 1/3 will die. NEC accounts for 19% of neonatal expenditures; about $100,000 per case or more than $5 billion annually. Human milk decreases an infant’s risk of NEC 80% compared to formula. The use of human milk also reduces the length of the hospital stay and decreases the risk of sepsis and other complications (Gephart, et. al, 2012). The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends human milk as the only appropriate food for VLBW babies.

 

Though pasteurized donor human milk is being shipped in from other states, it is costly. Further, that milk lacks the immune properties needed to defend infants from many harmful microorganisms endemic to Florida. Locally supplied and prepared donor human milk is needed for Florida’s 67 neonatal intensive care units. The out-of-state HMBANA accredited milk banks have been gradually, but steadily, shifting the responsibility to supply Florida’s NICUs to MMBFL. However, MMBFL is currently meeting less than half of the state’s need for milk.

Strategies
HelpWhat are the organization's strategies for its stated long-term goals?

In order to meet Florida’s need for safe, pasteurized donor human milk, MMBFL will:

Promote public awareness of the benefits of breastfeeding and human milk to the community with the aim of increasing breastfeeding rates in the state of Florida.

Provide education regarding the benefits of mother's own milk and safe, pasteurized donor milk (when mother's own milk is not available) for premature and ill infants.

Increase donor depot locations (approximately 20 exist at this time) and maintain a supply of donor human milk by screening healthy human milk donors using criteria established by the Human Milk Banking Association of North America.

Pasteurize and dispense safe pasteurized human milk to premature and critically ill infants per licensed health care provider prescription.

Continue the Babies at Home program and provide financial assistance to help with the cost of donor human milk for medically fragile infant at home.

Capabilities
HelpWhat are the organization’s capabilities for doing this? What resources, capacities, and connections support its progress towards long-term goals?

MMBFL currently operates state-of-the-art milk processing labs which include a refrigeration unit, five commercial freezers, an ice machine, an industrial milk analyzer, sophisticated temperature monitoring and data logging systems, a large capacity pasteurizer, and two small pasteurizers. Thanks to the generous support of our landlord and benefactor, OneBlood, a walk-in freezer is available for milk storage. Economies of scope between OneBlood and MMBFL has proven to be an invaluable advantage to our rapidly growing milk bank.

The members of the Board of Directors have a passionate commitment to the mission and include representatives from business, healthcare, and social service sectors. The Executive Director is a PhD prepared nurse scientist with many years of experience in maternal-child health. Part-time personnel include a Program Director, Community Outreach Coordinator, Volunteer coordinator, a Business Manager with extensive business and accounting experience, and several technicians who are involved in various milk bank operations. MMBFL has consistent volunteers who help with milk intake and distribution, clerical work, and event planning. MMBFL also has several generous supporters who have donated $50,000 to $150,000 each, to ensure that MMBFL can continue its mission.

 

There is an ample pool of donor moms, an experienced staff and Board of Directors, and established distributions channels with healthcare facilities. MMBFL has a solid foundation to build upon as it strives to meet Florida’s need for pasteurized donor human milk. 

Indicators
HelpHow will the organization know if it is making progress? What are the key qualitative and quantitative indicators against which the organization assesses its progress toward its intended impact?

OBJECTIVE #1: Within one year of receiving grant funds: The amount of PDHM available will increase by 50% from 4,000 ounces each week to 6,000 ounces each week. 

INDICATOR: Number of ounces pasteurized is tracked daily using Timeless Medical software. Weekly reports are provided to the Board of Directors’ Treasurer and summaries presented at Board of Directors’ meetings.

ACTIVITIES

Increase the number of ounces pasteurized. MMBFL obtained an unsecured loan to purchase and install a large capacity pasteurizer. Within one month the loan will be repaid. Within one year production will be at 6,000 ounces weekly.

Increase number of FTE to accommodate larger processing volume. Within one month MMBFL will partner with two organizations that assist women to recover from abusive situations to provide job training. Within three months there will be full-time leaders for processing, donor and community service, and material distribution sections.

Increase the number of committed volunteers through a strategic approach to community organizations and secure up to 2 FTE (80-hours) in processing section. Within three months: There will be volunteer commitments from three organizations that will provide 2-4 volunteers one 3-4 hour shift, one day each month. Within six months: There will be volunteer commitments from six additional organizations that will provide volunteers.

OBJECTIVE #2 Within one year of receiving grant funds: The number of facilities who use PDHM provided by MMBFL will increase from by 26 to 39 (50% ) and number of milk depot facilities from 20 to 30 (50%) using systematic outreach approach to managers, neonatologists, and clinical staff.

INDICATORS Number of ounces received and dispensed is tracked daily using Timeless Medical software. Weekly reports are provided to the Board of Directors' Treasurer, displayed in the lobby and summaries presented at Board of Directors’ meetings.

ACTIVITIES

Within one month the Community Outreach Coordinator and Executive Director will update of the list of Florida’s NICUs bed capacity. The Agency for Health Care Administration (ACHA) database available via internet from the State of Florida is the source of the bed capacity data. The Business manager and Executive Director will update contact persons in Florida’s birthing hospitals. The existing network of clinical and supply chain contacts will be the source of this data.

Within three months The Executive Director and Outreach Coordinator will review and update all promotional and educational materials. The Outreach coordinator position will be increased by .5 FTE to a total of 1 FTE.

Within one year by coordinating with other HMBANA milk banks, MMBFL will supply 75% of Florida’s NICUs with donor human milk programs. This work will be done by the Business Manager, Executive Director, processing leader, and distribution leader. The addition of full-time leaders will be needed in the milk processing and distribution areas.
Progress
HelpWhat has and hasn’t been accomplished so far?

Since opening in June 2015, MMBFL has received over 250,000 ounces of raw milk from our more than 450 approved milk donors and provided more than 150,000 ounces to recipient hospitals in Florida and nearby states who do not have a HMBANA accredited milk bank. There are 20,000 ounces of pasteurized milk available for distribution, 10,000 ounces of pasteurized milk pending laboratory results, and tens of thousands of ounces of raw donor milk pending processing.

Comparing 4th Quarter 2015 to 2016:

Donations of raw donor milk increased 28%

Number of ounces pasteurized increased 161%

Distribution of pasteurized donor human milk increased 169%

In mid-November 2016, the large capacity pasteurizer was installed and validated. The revision of processing procedures and work flow patterns were completed by Thanksgiving. A highly successful volunteer event, 10K Ways to Save a Baby, began one week later and ran four weeks. More than 80 volunteers worked 3-4 hours shifts to meet a processing goal of 10,000 ounces in one week. Our expectation was to meet 85% of goal by the 4th week. The expectation was met the first week and we exceeded 10,000 in the third week. This was both a delightful time to meet so many people from every age and background, but also a satisfying time as it proved our manufacturing process improvements to be effective, efficient, and agreeable to staff and volunteers.

There are ample stores of pasteurized milk to meet the needs of our existing recipient facilities. Despite rigorous application of best manufacturing principles and innovative production techniques, more is needed to increase production capacity to the level needed to supply all of Florida’s NICUs. The Executive Director, in addition to the usual duties, serves as operations manager. Greater than 50% of her time is spent in operations and donor service actives. Even at current production levels, this performance is not sustainable; it is untenable as our growth increases. Attracting and retaining capable leadership for processing, donor and community service, and material distribution sections is imperative. MMBFL has two part-time employees with the ability to fulfill leadership positions. Appropriate compensation packages that include educational opportunities for social entrepreneurs as well as pay and health benefits will make these leadership roles attractive to these individuals who have already demonstrated their abilities and commitment to our mission.

Our non-profit has seen high employee turnover. In part this is due to hiring college students who move on as their academic programs change or as they graduate. The work is essentially manufacturing and is steady, but not a likely career opportunity. It could be a stepping stone for women transitioning into the workforce, such as women recovering from an abusive situation. We think partnering with community social service provider could be a mutual win-win opportunity.
Programs
Description

The Community and Profession Education program communicates that donating breast milk is a unique act of kindness that helps Florida’s medically needy infants grow and thrive. The program goals are to encourage and promote breastfeeding, raise awareness of the need for pasteurized donor milk (PDHM), engage volunteers as fellow social entrepreneurs or as potential milk donors, and provide professionals with best practice information regarding the use and handling of PDHM.  Goals are achieved by reciprocal community engagement, evidence-based research, and marketing in print, broadcast, and internet media venues.

Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5)
People/Families of People with Health Conditions
US
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

MMBFL will have strong ties to 28 community centers that will honor a commitment to send 3-4 volunteers for one three-hour day each month. Hours are tracked in “time clock” computer program.

A statistically significant decrease in Florida rates for necrotizing enterocolitis. Several large birthing hospitals in Florida began their donor human milk programs in 2009. Florida Charts data from 2009 to 2013 shows a steady downward trend in the incidence of NEC among facilities with donor human milk programs.

A statistically significant increase in Florida rates for breastfeeding initiation, duration and exclusivity will improve. Evidence is portrayed in Florida Breastfeeding Report Card that is published annually by the Center for Disease Control.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

MMBFL will have strong ties to 28 community centers that will honor a commitment to send 3-4 volunteers for one three-hour day each month. Hours are tracked in “time clock” computer program.

A statistically significant decrease in Florida rates for necrotizing enterocolitis. Several large birthing hospitals in Florida began their donor human milk programs in 2009. Florida Charts data from 2009 to 2013 shows a steady downward trend in the incidence of NEC among facilities with donor human milk programs.

A statistically significant increase in Florida rates for breastfeeding initiation, duration and exclusivity will improve. Evidence is portrayed in Florida Breastfeeding Report Card that is published annually by the Center for Disease Control.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Success in recruiting a Community Outreach Coordinator will be evidenced by signed mutually agreed upon employment contract.
 
Completion of the birthing facility survey will be evidenced by a document that is is 100% complete and accurate in reporting the birthing facility's donor milk program status, clinical contact information, and number of NICU beds.
 
Success in volunteer partnerships with 7 community organizations will be evidenced by awarding certificates of achievement to the organizations and by "time clock" log-ins.
Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. This past year, MMBFL staffed several community events, maintained a vibrant internet presence, and was cited in numerous media venues. Staff at MMBFL screened 462 potential milk donors, provided education and support to 274 active donors, collaborated with 20 facilities to arrange milk-drop off sites, assisted 27 facilities with PDHM programs, partnered with local agencies to help bereaved mothers, and is a research partner with a Florida birthing hospital.During the holiday season of 2016, more than 90 volunteers participated in the 10K Ways to Save a Baby milk preparation drive. 
Description
MMBFL accepts donations from women who are healthy and have completed the screening process.  Donors can bring frozen milk directly to the milk bank, ship the milk using overnight express services, or drop the milk off at one of our milk depots. Local donors often bring milk directly to the milk bank. The majority of donor milk received at MMBFL is shipped in using overnight express services, either from the mother's home or a depot. MMBFL supplies all shipping materials and pays the shipping fees for all donor milk; there is no cost to donors or depots. 
 
Milk depot sites are partnerships with a medical facility or business that hosts a convenient location for mothers to bring their frozen breast milk for donation. There are 14 depot sites across Florida and more are in the process of development. About one-third of the donor milk is received through milk depots.
Population Served Families
Infants to Preschool (under age 5)
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. There are depots in Florida that currently ship their donor milk to HMBANA milk banks in other states. As MMBFL increases production capacity, these depots will become partners with the Florida bank. It is planned that this will occur by December 31, 2017.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Increasing the number of milk depots and providing greater coverage throughout the state of Florida will make donating milk more convenient for donors. As the need for donor human milk grows, depots will become the main source of milk.  It is planned that each county in Florida will have at least one milk depot by 2020.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Weekly monitoring of milk received from donors and depots. Monthly monitoring of facilities who are inquiring, in the process of, or have become milk depots
Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Mothers' Milk Bank has 20 Florida depots that thousands of ounces of milk for processing. 
Description
Donor human milk is processed at the Mothers’ Milk Bank of Florida facility, located in Orlando, Florida. At the processing facility, each deposit of human donor milk is:
Given an individual bar code
Stored in a negative 20 degree Celsius freezer until processing
Thawed
A sample for bacterial culture is obtained
Nutritional analysis
Strained and pooled with other donors
Bottled into recyclable containers
Pasteurized
Cultured for the absence of post pasteurization bacteria
Each bottle individually identified by bar code
Frozen and stored at negative 20 degree Celsius.
 
Milk from several donors is pooled to ensure nutritional adequacy. At the end of pasteurization, bacterial colony counts must be zero - no bacterial growth should be detected. The frozen milk is ready for distribution to hospitals and babies at home. MMBFL operates under the Human Milk Banking Association of North America (HMBANA) guidelines, adhering to industry standards for donor milk pasteurization and storage.
Population Served Females
Infants to Preschool (under age 5)
Families
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Within one year of receiving grant funds: The amount of PDHM available will increase by 50% from 4,000 ounces each week to 6,000 ounces each week.
 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
MMBFL defines long term success as:
 
1) Maintaining the integrity of the processed milk by continued adherence to HMBANA guidelines that require zero bacterial counts in post-pasteurization cultures of milk.
 
2) Produce enough pasteurized donor human milk to meet the needs of Florida's NICUs and medially fragile babies at home. 
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Number of ounces pasteurized is tracked daily using Timeless Medical software. Weekly reports are provided to the Board of Directors’ Treasurer and summaries presented at Board of Directors’ meetings.
Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.   

· CComparing 4th Quarter 2015 to 2016:

Donations of raw donor milk increased 28%

Number of ounces pasteurized increased 161%

Distribution of pasteurized donor human milk increased 169%

Description
Parents and health care providers of who are critically ill, under 3.4 pounds, or  born at less than 29 weeks gestation want to provide safe nutrition to these fragile babies. Mother's own milk is the best form of nutrition, but when that is not available, pasteurized donor human milk is best.
Infants who receive pasteurized human milk experience shorter hospital stays, have better survival rates, less chronic health issues, and receive the perfect combination of calories and protein to develop, survive and thrive. As the only processing milk bank in Florida, Mothers’ Milk Bank is vital to the goal of meeting the demand for pasteurized donor milk in the state. Donor milk is dispensed by prescription from the recipient’s health care provider. Most often, it is prescribed for use in the hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) for premature or critically ill babies. Donor milk will also be shipped to outpatient recipients’ homes when the "Babies at Home" program is implemented.
Population Served
Infants to Preschool (under age 5)
Families
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
MMBFL defines short term success as:
1) Provide pasteurized donor human milk to 50% of Florida's NICUs that are using human milk
2) Expaned the Babies at Home program
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. MMBFL defines long term success as being able to meet the need for pasteurized donor human milk for medically fragile infants in the state of Florida. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Monthly monitoring of numbers of contracted hospitals and facilities in the process of becoming affiliated with MMBFL.
Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

· Comparing 4th Quarter 2015 to 2016:

Donations of raw donor milk increased 28%

Number of ounces pasteurized increased 161%

Distribution of pasteurized donor human milk increased 169%

Description
The Babies at Home program provides financial assistance to families who need life-saving donor human milk for their medically fragile infant. Donor milk costs $4.00 per ounce, which covers the cost of collecting and processing donor milk. Processing fees for a baby who needs 24 ounces of milk per day is $96. This cost is greater than most Florida families can afford.
 
A prescription from a licensed health care provider is required in order for pasteurized donor milk to be dispensed to hospitals and medically fragile babies at home. A triage system is in place to prioritize the distribution of pasteurized human milk to the most critically ill babies first. While families do not usually incur additional costs to receive pasteurized donor milk while their infant is in the hospital, they do incur out-of-pocket expenses to receive pasteurized donor milk once their infant is discharged from the hospital.
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5)
Families
Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Every medically fragile baby in Florida will have access to donor human milk regardless of insurance or the family’s financial resources. Third party payer for reimbursement of processing costs is essential to ensuring equitable access for Florida's medically fragile infants. California, Kansas, Missouri, New York, Texas, Utah, and Washington, D.C. have some provision for Medicaid reimbursement for pasteurized donor human milk. There are very few instances of insurance coverage. Mothers' Milk Bank of Florida will play a key role in bringing about legislation to ensure equity of access to pasteurized donor human milk.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. A call log is kept that describes the purpose of the call. Requests for outpatient milk will be monitored by the Executive Director and Program Director. Financial accounting will detail the number of infants served, amount of milk dispensed, and duration of service.
Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

 In 2016, we provided $17,000 in charitable care to babies who needed life-saving donor milk to survive but whose families did not have the financial resources to cover the full cost.

Most babies will need donor milk for a week or possibly one month following hospital discharge. Some babies will need donor milk for a much longer time. One two-month old and had barely regained birth weight. Her mother was unable to provide enough breast milk and various types of formula were tried. Every formula the family tried resulted in painful episodes as a result of food intolerances.

 
This little one finally began refusing to eat and would have willingly starved to death rather than continue to experience pain associated with every feeding. She started receiving pasteurized donor milk and began to thrive. She double her birth weight at six months and then her mother began introducing complementary foods. At 10 months of age, human milk continues to be an important part of her nutritional intake.
 
Board Chair
Board Chair Mrs. Layne Petrino ARNP, NNP-BC, CLC
Company Affiliation Nemours Childrens' Hospital
Term Nov 2014 to Oct 2016
Board Co-Chair
Board Co-Chair
Board
Board Members
NameCompany AffiliationsStatusCertificate*
Ms. Maureen Crissy RN, BSN, IBCLC, RLCAmeda Breastfeeding ProductsVoting
Dr. Reina Mayor Florida HospitalVoting
Dr. Kandis Natoli Executive DirectorMMBFLVotingYes
Ms. Kendra Otero RN, IBCLCFlorida HospitalVoting
Mrs. Layne Petrino ARNP, NNP-BC, CLCNemours Childrens' HospitalVoting
Ms. Vickie Podrez RN, IBCLCWinnie Palmer HositalVotingYes
Ms. Alicia Prichard OneBloodVoting
Dr. Anoop Pulickal Florida HospitalVoting
Dr. Lakshmi Rajkumar Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women and BabiesVoting
Mr. Scott Reed PAHill, Rugh, Keller & Main, P.A.Voting
Ms Dawn Steward Healthy StartVoting
Mr. Scott Taylor Encore Farms, Board TreasurerVoting
*This individual has been awarded a Certificate in Orientation to Board Service by the Edyth Bush Institute for Philanthropy & Nonprofit Leadership at Rollins College ebi.rollins.edu,
Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 3
Board Ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 10
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 2
Other (if specified) Indian
Policies
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 75%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Standing Committees
Standing Committees
Committee Name
Executive
Finance
Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
Community Outreach / Community Relations
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Comments
CEO Comments Out of necessity in the nascent stages of the milk bank, our board members were generally medical and financial professionals. Our challenge now is to add additional community members with varying areas of expertise to further round out the board, especially in the areas of business development and marketing.
CEO/Executive Director
CEO/Executive Director Kandis Natoli PhD, RNC, IBCLC
Term Start Aug 2015
Email knatoli@milkbankofflorida.org
Experience

The Executive Director is a PhD nursing researcher whose research interests includes human lactation. She has been a Maternal-Newborn Certified Registered Nurse for more than 15 years and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant for more than 15 years. Dr. Natoli comes to the Mothers’ Milk Bank of Florida after serving as an instructor of nursing for the last seven years and brings a diverse skill set to this organization. Ms Natoli’s doctoral research was an independent, original research program that involved over 300 participants. She designed, won competitive grant funding, prepared educational documents, oversaw the manufacture, and implemented the product intervention. 

CEO Salary Range $50,001 - $75,000
Former CEOs
Former CEOs
NameStartEnd
Karen Kesler Jan Aug
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 13
Number of Volunteers 80
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Senior Staff
Title Program Director
Experience/Biography Linda Califf, BED, LCCE, FACCE, has been teaching pregnant couples all phases of childbirth education since 1976. She has been the Birth Coordinator for Florida Hospital since 1992. Working in a hospital setting she has seen the difference donor milk has made to pre term babies, and has become passionate about establishing a Milk Bank for the babies in our state. She has been a part of the Mother’s Milk Bank of Florida since the beginning and serves as our Program Director.
Title Office Manager
Experience/Biography Melissa Robinson joined MMBFL in 2015. She is an experienced bookkeeper, inventory & procurement specialist, and office manager. Missy brings a wealth of practical business experience.
Plans
Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Date Strategic Plan Adopted July 2016
Management Succession Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Other
Collaborations
Mothers Milk Bank has special collaborations with several organizations for the purpose of assisting mothers' milk donors.
 
Lee Memorial/ Health Park Medical Center
9981 S. Health Park Drive suite 450
Fort Myers, FL 33908
Lee Co
239 343-6024
 
Cape Coral Hospital
636 Del Prado Blvd.
Cape Coral, FL. 33990
Lee Co
239 424-2217
 
Winter Park Memorial Hospital
200 N. Lakemont Ave
Winter Park, FL
(407) 646-700
Orange Co 
 
Manatee Memorial
250 2nd St. E. Suite 3F
Bradenton, FL. 34208
Manatee Co
941 745-6925
 
South Lake Hospital
1900 Don Wickham Drive
Clermont, FL. 34711
Lake Co
352 394-4071 x 4380
 
Sarasota Memorial
1700 South Tamiami Trail
Sarasota, FL. 34239
Sarasota Co
941 917-7413
 
Florida Hospital Orlando
2520 N. Orange Ave. Suite 103
Orlando, FL. 32804
Orange Co
407 303-2599
Winnie Palmer Hospital
83 West Miller St.
Orlando, FL. 32806
Orange Co
321 843-8264
 
Celebrate Birth Lakeland
1525 Edgewater Beach Drive
Lakeland, FL. 33805
Polk Co
863 680-2229
 
Natural Birthworks
7630 Wiles Road
Coral Springs, FL. 33067
Broward Co
954 960-3213
 
Boca Raton Regional Hospital
800 Meadows Road
Boca Raton, FL. 33486
561 955-5415
 
Ellen’s Birth Bungalow
204 E. Drury Ave.
Kissimmee, FL. 34744.
Osceola Co
407 978-6705 (store)
Risk Management Provisions
Risk Management Provisions
General Property Coverage and Professional Liability
CEO Comments The only full-time employee the bank has is the executive director. We desire 3 full-time positions at the team leader level.
State Registration Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Expiration Month Dec
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Expiration Year 2017
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01, 2016
Fiscal Year End Dec 31, 2016
Detailed Financials
Expense Allocations
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$310,891$28,457$7,318
Administration Expense$56,826$124,679$3,447
Fundraising Expense$2,711$4,371$5,409
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$2,625
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.291.147.67
Program Expense/Total Expenses84%18%39%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue3%4%4%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$268,503$167,660$0
Current Assets$90,668$43,081$0
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$76,137$6,771$0
Total Net Assets$192,366$160,889$0
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountEarned Revenue $379,608Foundations and Corporations $93,864Foundations and Corporations $120,939
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountFondations and Corporations $90,105Earned Revenue $64,024Individuals $23,177
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountIndividuals $7,883Individuals $20,883 --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.196.36--
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%--
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
CEO Comments

Milk donors were far more generous that we anticipated and the amount of milk received greatly exceeded our budget for milk acquisition and storage. Advice from veteran milk bank directors was to accept milk rather that turn milk donors away. We were greatly challenged by this situation and studied, learned, and improved our productivity; then asked for help from our landlord, OneBlood. OneBlood came through with an additional safe storage site for our raw milk and also provided excellent mentorship that helped our productivity gains. We invested in a large capacity pasteurizer and our productive capacity is now equal to the amount of milk we receive from our donors. The pasteurizer is currently running at 50% capacity and we rarely use our two smaller pasteurizers.

 

Our next challenge is to increase both the volume of milk received and the volume of milk processed. The responsibility for suppling Florida’s neonatal intensive care units will continue to transfer from the out-of-state milk banks to our milk bank. We have the equipment and space needed to increase service and production. The success of this next level of growth will, in a large measure, be dependent on our ability to attract and retain personnel to supervise activities in donor service, processing, and distribution. We have an excellent prospect for production supervisor and would like to offer this individual a good staring compensation package and opportunity to complete the Certificate in Nonprofit Management from the Edyth Bush Institute.

 

We recognize that additional funding is needed to continue our mission. The recipient facilities have a vested interest in our continued success and we will approach their Community Foundation or equivalent community investment funding operation as a grant applicant. Our experience improving productivity makes us good a candidate for research grant funds. We will respond the call for research in human milk and seek grant funding for activities designed to improve quality and simplify processing. The final source of non-traditional funding we will pursue is to seek Medicaid reimbursement for pasteurized donor human milk. For extremely premature infants, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends only human milk as the infant’s source of nutrition. Medicaid covers the cost of total parenteral nutrition (nutrition through an IV) and nutritional products that are used in adult patients with feeding tube devices. It is reasonable to request similar reimbursement for infants who need human milk to meet their nutritional requirements.

Foundation Comments
Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster
Notes Programs listed here are those that are only activated during a disaster. Some organizations have unified budgeting and do not budget by program. Because of this, some budget fields may be blank or represent an approximation. Organization describes previous experience during the immediate response, recovery or rebuilding phases following a disaster.
Nonprofit Mothers' Milk Bank of Florida, Inc.
Address 8669 Commodity Circle Suite 490
Orlando, FL 32819
Primary Phone (407) 248 5050
CEO/Executive Director Kandis Natoli PhD, RNC, IBCLC
Board Chair Mrs. Layne Petrino ARNP, NNP-BC, CLC
Board Chair Company Affiliation Nemours Childrens' Hospital
Year of Incorporation 2012