Polis Institute Inc.
1123 W. Conroy Street
Orlando FL 32805
Contact Information
Address 1123 W. Conroy Street
Orlando, FL 32805
Phone (866) 757-1334
Web and Social Media
Donate with a credit card http://polisinstitute.org/donate-2/
LinkedIn
Instagram
Video
POLIS Founder with Leadership Eatonville resident leaders.
Mission
Mission

We champion human dignity by designing solutions to the social problems that infringe upon it. Our current efforts are focused on revitalizing distressed neighborhoods in Orlando, Florida in order to alleviate the burden of concentrated poverty.

Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Philip K Hissom
Board Chair Mr. Dan Sherfield
Board Chair Company Affiliation Summit Church, Connect Director
History
IRS Ruling Year 2010
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expense Bar Graph
 
 
Projected Revenue $355,000.00
Projected Expenses $355,000.00
Statements
Mission

We champion human dignity by designing solutions to the social problems that infringe upon it. Our current efforts are focused on revitalizing distressed neighborhoods in Orlando, Florida in order to alleviate the burden of concentrated poverty.

Impact

 ACCOMPLISHMENTS

1. The development of a Community Leadership program that was piloted in historic Eatonville and led to 13 new community initiatives developed by residents

2. The successful launch of MVP Families with 55 West Lakes families that we are helping reach their goals

3. The creation of Dignity Serves Partners program that allows us to further the efforts of 150 trained facilitators from across the country to lead trainings and implement the principles in their context. 

GOALS

1. Develop Community Scorecards for West Lakes and Eatonville that are used by all formal partners with the community to track progress

2. Grow MVP Families program to100 families and realize 90% progress rate on family goals

3. Support Dignity Serves Partners so that 10,000 people are exposed to the principles
Independent Research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or program effectiveness? No
Needs
Capacity Building: As we work to grow and scale our model, we are in need of increased funding to launch us into our next phase of influence. Please contact us for more information on how we are working to grow. $70K 
 
Funding for Research: Evaluate and update our Neighborhood Stress Index which monitors community development efforts based on the overall well-being of distressed neighborhoods in the Central Florida region. $50K
 
Website Redesign: Making our website more relevant for all of our stakeholders by making the Neighborhood Stress Index map more accessible and reformatting the user experience to make our content more relevant. $5K
 
Increased Donations: Monthly contributions help offset the cost of our programs and increase our capacity to serve our stakeholders well. On March 14, 2017 we launched a campaign called Project Amplify to raise funds to create and disseminate our tools more effectively so that more people are helped and more neighborhoods are strengthened. Our current tiers are below, though contributions of any size are greatly appreciated:
  • $10,000 Foundational Supporters help us create a new comprehensive toolkit
  • $5,000 Promotional Supporters help us disseminate the new toolkit 
  • $2,500 Program Supporters help us deliver programs that change lives and inform our work
  • $1,000 Research Supporters help us adequately asses our programming in real time
Board Appointments: POLIS is seeking to grow and diversify our existing board through the expertise of business and community leaders. If you are interested in being a part of our board, please contact us at info@polisinstitute.org.
Background

“Polis” is the Greek word for city and the Institute exists to ensure that the poor and disenfranchised are actively involved in shaping that story. While our work is primarily focused in Orlando, Florida and we have consulted with organizations across the country to help them engage with distressed communities in dignified and effective ways.

It began in 2005 with Vonette Bright, co-founder of Campus Crusade for Christ, then evolved into a research project, focused on the culture of service in Greater Orlando called “Seeking the Welfare of the City.” Dr. James, an Oxford trained historian, recruited seminary students to work on the project that he began to call Polis. In 2009, the project ended and the team gleaned three main findings from the report: 1) there were 100 distressed neighborhoods in Greater Orlando, 2) Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) was the best-supported modality to alleviate that distress, and 3) there was no evidence of mature ABCD work in the area.

The report went on to recommended these four things: 1) establish an urban institute to guide ABCD with the distressed neighborhoods; 2) compel influential leaders to champion the cause; 3) create formal partnerships to engage in the work in all 100 neighborhoods, one neighborhood at a time; 4) invest in the community-led initiatives that emerge from the ABCD process.

Phil Hissom, who had been asked to the lead the project during its latter stages, incorporated the Polis Institute in May of 2009 as a direct response to these recommendations and has been leading the charge ever since.

The work of Polis Institute is under-girded by the Biblical-narrative of humanity’s journey from the garden to the city (polis). We help make places more like the promised New City described in Isaiah 65 – where people enjoy the fruit of their labor in long and healthy lives. Our origins are unapologetically Christian but we specialize in finding common ground with all people of good will so that quality of life improves in distressed places.

NTEE Information
Primary Organization Type Community Improvement, Capacity Building
Primary Organization SubType Community & Neighbourhood Development
Secondary Organization Type Public & Societal Benefit
Secondary Organiztion SubType Leadership Development
Tertiary Organization Type Religion- Related
Tertiary Organization SubType Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis
Areas Served
Geographic Areas Served
FL
FL - Orange
FL - Seminole
By neighborhood and zip code:
  • Eatonville (FL) - 32751
  • West Lakes (FL) - 32805
  • Downtown Orlando (FL) - 32801
  • East Winter Garden (FL) - 32819
Goals
HelpWhat is the organization aiming to accomplish? This is the organization's ultimate goal for intended impact.

Polis Institute strengthens the distressed neighborhoods of Metro Orlando in order to enhance the area’s overall well-being. By 2030, Metro Orlando will be in the 90th percentile of large metros in the United States for well-being.

In 2007, the majority of humans lived in cities for the first time. We believe that the best way to improve our world is to improve our cities. Our ultimate aim is to become the world’s most helpful think tank and the leading expert on how to build thriving cities. We hope to utilize our experience in Orlando over a generation as the launch pad to achieve our biggest goal by 2050.
Strategies
HelpWhat are the organization's strategies for its stated long-term goals?

A city is only as strong as its weakest neighborhood. Neighborhoods weaken through disinvestment. Our strategy is to guide dignified investment in Metro Orlando’s most distressed neighborhoods with three groups: 1) neighborhood residents; 2) regionally influential leaders; and 3) service providers. We directly engage each of these groups, create strategic plans, monitor progress, and enhance capacity to lead the investment strategy best suited for each particular neighborhood and best supported by research.

We serve as a mid-stream think tank, taking the highest level academic research, applying it in a local context, and then sharing what we learn with our upstream partners. We believe that this approach not only helps us better serve our local clients but also improves the broader understanding of how to successfully approach our most complex social problems.

Capabilities
HelpWhat are the organization’s capabilities for doing this? What resources, capacities, and connections support its progress towards long-term goals?

Our staff includes a Founder/Director who has a lifetime of experience working with the urban poor and the past ten years revitalizing neighborhoods. He spent his early career guiding an extremely complex data management effort for improving the 64,000 square mile Chesapeake Bay watershed. Other staff include community organizers, researchers, educators, activists, and residents of distressed neighborhoods who are employed and trained to guide redevelopment efforts.

Our partners include the most influential leaders in our region, such as, LIFT Orlando, Winter Park Health Foundation, Haddock Family Foundation, Florida Citrus Sports, Seneff Family Foundation, St. Luke’s United Methodist Church, and First Presbyterian Church of Orlando. We also partner with world class academic institutions such as the University of Virginia.
Indicators
HelpHow will the organization know if it is making progress? What are the key qualitative and quantitative indicators against which the organization assesses its progress toward its intended impact?

Gallup Well-being Index:Beginning 2009, Gallup and Healthways began a long-term project to assess well-being in America. Annually, they rank the country’s cities. Metro Orlando (Orange, Seminole, Osceola, and Lake Counties) has averaged around the 51st percentile since then. The goal is to be above the 90th percentile by 2030.

Neighborhood Stress Index (NSI): We created the NSI in our initial research (2006-09). It is an ordinal ranking of the neighborhoods (as U.S. Census Block Groups) of Orange and Seminole Counties along four key indicators: median household income, percentage of adults over 25 with a High School diploma, percentage of vacant housing units, and overall crime index. The baseline NSI identified 100 distressed neighborhoods in Orange and Seminole Counties. The goal is to get cross-sector redevelopment initiatives underway with significant resident involvement in each of these neighborhoods.

Neighborhood Redevelopment Evaluation: We evaluate neighborhood redevelopment efforts by assessing the following:

  • Is there a comprehensive plan in place that has significant leadership and investment capacity, cross-sector partnerships, and resident participation?

  • Is progress being made on the plan?

  • How are particular programs contributing to the overall improvement?

  • Does the redevelopment move the needle on key NSI and Gallup Well-being metrics?

Equipping Leaders: The work of dignified neighborhood investment involves key principles that we teach and coach others to implement in their context. We also participate in public forums, facilitate working groups, and utilize social media to educate the broader community on the issues affecting people living in concentrated poverty.
Progress
HelpWhat has and hasn’t been accomplished so far?

Well-being: Metro Orlando’s position on the Gallup well-being ranking for cities has remained relatively flat since 2009 averaging at the 51st percentile. Our goal is for Orlando to be in the 90th percentile by 2030. We have been monitoring this index and communicating the importance of well-being to various groups but have yet to convince influential leaders to pursue moving the needle on this particular index with a concerted effort.

Neighborhood Stress Index: Using the U.S. Census Block Group geography, our baseline data revealed 100 distressed “neighborhoods” (out of 507 in Orange and Seminole Counties). This index is an ordinal ranking and was originally intended to reveal targeted areas for redevelopment as opposed to a progress indicator since roughly 20% of the neighborhoods would always be in ‘distress’. We plan to update this tool so that it is scaled (to 100) and therefore theoretically possible to eliminate the distress neighborhoods from our region. This new tool will be updated annually and serve as a key tracking instrument.

Neighborhood Redevelopment: There were no neighborhood redevelopment efforts that met our criteria for a comprehensive redevelopment plan when we began in 2009 (typically because of either the lack of geographic focus or resident involvement and direct benefit). Currently, there are 12 such efforts affecting 33 of the 100 distressed neighborhoods. Additionally, we have helped improve the impact of particular programs (that are not yet part of a comprehensive redevelopment plan) in 22 additional neighborhoods for a total of 55 out of 100 neighborhoods.

Equipping Leaders: The first five years of our long-term strategic plan focused on equipping non-profits and volunteers to think about charity in new ways - more asset-based, place-focused, long-term, holistic. Our aim was to find an influential group to spearhead this approach in a specific location. This hope was fully realized with LIFT Orlando for whom we have been guiding their community engagement and evaluation since before they formed as an organization (beginning late 2012). This has been our most significant accomplishment to date. In 2015, we began to track leaders that we are specifically influencing with the our coaching and training.

YEAR

Volunteers

Non-profits

Neighborhoods

Leaders

2015

1200

104

55

165

2014

3200

28

28

 

2013

1500

20

56

 

2012

1200

18

55

 

2011

700

11

50

 

2010

740

6

50

 
Programs
Description The Metro Orlando Cooperative for Thriving Neighborhoods, affectionately known as MO CO-OP (think “more cooperation”), is an Orlando-based initiative that exists to improve quality of life in the 100 distressed neighborhoods of Orange and Seminole Counties, Florida. The 100 neighborhoods were identified in a research project (2006-2009) on the culture of service in Central Florida that sparked the formation of the Polis Institute. MO CO-OP participants are actively working on place- and asset-based efforts in over half of the neighborhoods and meet monthly for encouragement and shared learning.
Population Served At-Risk Populations
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
We currently have a core group of folks from a handful of the distressed neighborhoods that are committing to participating in monthly meetings as well as representatives from the city that attend.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Our hope is to have at least one representative from each of the distressed neighborhoods in Orlando participating so that different neighborhoods can learn from each other. POLIS also hopes to receive progress reports from every distressed neighborhood to get a better overall picture of the health of our city.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Attendance at monthly meetings. Attendees from neighborhoods self report on progress based on principles outlined at the MO COOP.
Description The first program launched by Polis Institute in 2008, Dignity Serves has helped thousands of people learn the joy of dignified interdependence – the ideal context for meeting human need. Dignity Serves has become both a study and a community. The study is a six-lesson curriculum taught by trained facilitators that elucidates core principles of service and practical applications for every aspect of life. The community consists of those whose lives have been changed by the teaching and help one another live out its teachings which are grounded in a Christian perspective.
Population Served Adults
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
We hope to continue to grow the total number of trained participants and facilitators. We currently have 150 trained facilitators from across the country and recently created a Dignity Serves Partners program that allows us to further the efforts of those facilitators to lead trainings and implement the principles in their context. We continue to support the expansion and implementation of the Dignity Serves in the curriculum of church and service organizations. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
To help the church serve in ways that value the inherent dignity in the populations they aim to help and to see the true community development that elevates people above the poverty level by giving them ownership, valuing their assets, and empowering distressed neighbors to help realize their own goals. Our goal for this year is to support Dignity Serves Partners so that 10,000 people are exposed to the principles.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Dignity Serves is tracked through the total number of trained participants and facilitators. Additionally, we've completed feedback surveys throughout the course of the program's existence both to track success and to continue to develop the material. We are currently on the fifth edition of the training materials. 
Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
“How we think determines how we see and act. Dignity Serves is a valuable resource for the church as we reclaim our vision of neighbors and what ministry can look like with them.”
ANDY ODLE, PH.D., CHURCH ON THE STREET MINISTRIES, ATLANTA
Description

MVP Families is a youth enrichment program in downtown Orlando.The program is the extension of the MVP Summer Camp run in West Lakes community for the past 21 years. Through the combined efforts of FCS in partnership with Lift Orlando, Florida Blue, and the Polis Institute, the program is seeking to engage families in the 32805 neighborhood. Program objectives include assisting students with college acceptance and scholarships, developing community leaders, strengthening the bonds between parents and children, connecting families with other families, and setting and achieving family goals.

Population Served Families
At-Risk Populations
Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Once a the month, leading up to the MVP summer camp next summer, a dinner will be prepared for and by MVP Families program participants. Child care will be provided, allowing space and opportunity for meaningful discussion among the adults in a holistic approach to community transformation.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Our goal is to Grow MVP Families program to 100 families, to help those families realize 90% progress rate on their family goals, and to have 100% of participants come from our target neighborhood. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Family attendance is monitored by participation in monthly meetings. Students GPAs are tracked through report cards and families receive tickets to games based on student grades and family attendance. Participants self report on how they are attaining the health and wellness goals for their families.
Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
We are currently partnering with 55 MVP Families in the West Lakes community that we are helping set and reach family goals.

Barbara and her daughter are one of our core MVP Families. They look forward to every meeting and haven’t missed a single one. One week, when Barbara didn’t get the reminder text for the upcoming meeting when she expected it, she called our Family Engagement Coordinator, Shawn, to make sure everything was on track and to see if he needed any help.

To these core families, MVP Families is becoming a very important part of life. In the past two sessions, families have built goals together beginning with academic goals for the children. They have also worked on two family goals – a health and wellness goal and a financial stability goal. Barbara is focused on reading more with her daughter so that she “learns the right words and is ready for school.” She has also set goals to eat healthier and to secure more hours at her job at Vacation Lodge.

Description Leadership Eatonville is a Growth Leadership pilot program developed in the historic town of Eatonville as a training resource for residents to develop and realize their own community initiatives. Participants are trained in asset-based community development, human-centered design, project management, principled leadership, and public speaking.
Population Served
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The Growth Leadership program was created this year as a pilot program. We had 45 participants throughout the course that led to 13 new community initiatives developed by residents.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. We will be implementing a second round of the original Growth Leadership program this year as we work to help residents from the pilot program bring their initiatives to life in the Eatonville community.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. We are working to develop Community Scorecards for Eatonville that are used by all formal partners with the community to track progress.
Examples of SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. There were 13 new community initiatives developed by residents that include making healthy eating fun, interrupting the school to prison pipeline, after school activities for at-risk youth, and developing healthy communication and interaction between community members and local police. 
Description

ACBD originated in the 1990s out of Northwestern University. Its most basic principle is simple – leveraging the strengths and talents of a community to address its concerns is a more effective and sustainable practice than trying to fix its shortcomings.

POLIS has been practicing and training ABCD since it was founded in 2009 and  has developed a practical tool-kit for implementing ABCD through years of hands on experience as both practitioners of ABCD and as coaches/trainers of the model.
Population Served Adults
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Attendees are taught the POLIS model for community revitalization and how to use the ABCD Tool-Kit during the following six modules:

  1. Building Community While Improving Career Skills
  2. Developing Community Leaders
  3. Discovering Community Assets
  4. Designing Community Initiatives
  5. Building Partnerships that Work
  6. Community Level Goals and Accountability
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Through ABCD we have seen individual lives enriched through better relationships and networks, and by attaining new skills, greater purpose, and more hope. We have seen high crime areas eliminate violent crime in their community without substantial law enforcement investment; substandard and hazardous housing redeveloped into affordable, quality homes; families move out of poverty; churches become a more integral part of the community; partnerships form between business, government and non-profits; educational programs become more effective and focused on families.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

POLIS tracks the total number of trained participants and helps folks implement the model into their work through follow up conversations and consulting. 

Description The Polis Institute hosts Diverse Word in West Lakes every Tuesday from 4pm-6pm as another way to engage community members in 32805. Diverse Word is an open mic night that houses everything from performance poetry to stand-up/improv comedy. This night is free, though donations are accepted and appreciated to help fund our quarterly slam competitions and features.
Population Served At-Risk Populations
K-12 (5-19 years)
Minorities
Comments
CEO Comments Polis Institute is uniquely positioned to lead the region in the work of creating place-based solutions through action research. We are currently in a season of scaling our model and are looking for capacity building support to make our work sustainable in the long run.
Board Chair
Board Chair Mr. Dan Sherfield
Company Affiliation Summit Church, Connect Director
Term Sept 2012 to Sept 2018
Board Co-Chair
Board Co-Chair
Board
Board Members
NameCompany AffiliationsStatusCertificate*
Ms. Jessica Jetton Care for AIDS, Donor Engagement DirectorVotingNo
Mr. Scott Lee Elevation Financial, VP of Business & Philanthropic DevelopmentVotingYes
Mr. Dan Sherfield Summit Church, Connections CoordinatorVotingNo
*This individual has been awarded a Certificate in Orientation to Board Service by the Edyth Bush Institute for Philanthropy & Nonprofit Leadership at Rollins College ebi.rollins.edu,
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 6
Board Ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 3
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0
Policies
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 33%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 67%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No
Comments
CEO Comments POLIS, in conjunction with the help of our current board members, is working to expand our Board both in diversity and influence. 
CEO/Executive Director
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Philip K Hissom
Term Start May 2009
Email phil@polisinstitute.org
Experience Phil Hissom has spent his career designing solutions to complex social problems. Initially focused on environmental issues related to the Chesapeake Bay, Phil has more recently been addressing concentrated poverty, homelessness, and other affronts to human dignity. After receiving a Master of Divinity degree in 2008, Phil founded the POLIS Institute to equip community leaders to alleviate distress in Orlando neighborhoods. He hails from a ministry family that has been laboring with the poor for four generations in Charleston, West Virginia. His immediate family includes his wife, Jennie, who is a children's author, three teenage children, and their lovable mutt, Liberty.
CEO Salary Range $75,001 - $100,000
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 2
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 4
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Senior Staff
Title Family Engagement Coordinator
Experience/Biography Shawn Welcome has been engaged in community improvement since creating a poetry and life skills program for youth offenders at the 33rd Street Jail in 2006. Shawn is the founder and host of Diverse Word, the longest running, weekly open mic gathering in Orlando. In the past, Shawn has devoted himself to area nonprofits including The Hope Community Center, the Orlando Boys & Girls Club, Frontline Outreach Community Center, and Professional Opportunities Program for Students (POPS), a youth empowerment and internships program. Shawn Welcome is the proud father of four children and married to his beautiful wife, Jannah.
Title Communication Director
Experience/Biography Ingrained with a desire for lasting systemic change, Pam Amundsen’s commitment to justice-based solutions has led her to work on farms, partner with small, local businesses, and land in the nonprofit world. With a Bachelors in Marketing, her aim is to promote initiatives worth following and to come alongside people working for change. Pam and her husband, Roger, live in a small apartment where they try to be good neighbors.
Other
Collaborations
LIFT Orlando: Key to our model is a galvanized group of high capacity leaders willing to make a long-term investment with a particular neighborhood. Such a group is rare but in 2013, Lift Orlando formed with a focus to do just that within a 3/4 square mile area just west of downtown Orlando. Polis has provided strategic consultation, baseline demographics, and a comprehensive asset map of that very same neighborhood since before Lift was created. So, the two companies teamed up to organize the local community to build initiatives that have significant community involvement with real community leadership.
Winter Park Health Foundation: The WPHF has been our key partner in Eatonville the past two years, providing grant funding for us to create the curriculum for and execute a Growth Leadership program for Eatonville residents. 
Florida Citrus Sports: Florida Citrus Sports (FCS) was established to benefit children in Central Florida and it has utilized its sporting and entertainment events, which take place at the Citrus Bowl, to do just that. Large-scale sporting venues do not typically bring prosperity to the communities in which they reside, but FCS wants to break from the norm. When they decided that they wanted to use the redevelopment of the stadium to benefit the neighborhoods around the stadium, they asked Polis to help. FCS and Polis continue to invest in long-term relationships with the families who live near the stadium. 
Awards
AwardAwarding OrganizationYear
Community Impact AwardDream Builders Network2016
Footprint AwardAllegra2012
Alumni of the YearLifework Leadership2017
State Registration No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Expiration Month June
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Expiration Year 2018
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01, 2017
Fiscal Year End Dec 31, 2017
Documents
Form 990s
YearDocument
20162016 990
2015Form 990 2015
2014Form 990 2014
2013Form 990 EZ 2013
2012Form 990
2011Form 990
2010Form 990
IRS Letter of Determination
IRS Determination letter
Detailed Financials
Expense Allocations
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$12,267$23,955$164,257
Administration Expense$181,533$204,013$19,335
Fundraising Expense$0$0$0
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.050.861.24
Program Expense/Total Expenses6%11%89%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$40,586$30,426$62,681
Current Assets$40,586$30,426$62,681
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$0$0$0
Total Net Assets$40,586$30,426$62,681
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountFoundations, Corporations and Individuals $203,530Foundations, Corporations and Individuals $195,713Government $138,533
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --Foundations, Corporations and Individuals $89,919
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities------
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
CEO Comments
Foundation Comments
Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster
Notes Programs listed here are those that are only activated during a disaster. Some organizations have unified budgeting and do not budget by program. Because of this, some budget fields may be blank or represent an approximation. Organization describes previous experience during the immediate response, recovery or rebuilding phases following a disaster.
Nonprofit Polis Institute Inc.
Address 1123 W. Conroy Street
Orlando, FL 32805
Primary Phone (866) 757-1334
Contact Email info@polisinstitute.org
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Philip K Hissom
Board Chair Mr. Dan Sherfield
Board Chair Company Affiliation Summit Church, Connect Director
Year of Incorporation 2010